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healthy th(ink)ing by KeithWommack
Keith Wommack
Mar 28, 2012 | 1693 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

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Race to Health Opens Door for Spirituality
by KeithWommack
Aug 20, 2012 | 273 views | 0 0 comments | 28 28 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

There seems to be an urgency when it comes to health care. Perhaps, because of this, more consideration is being given to thought, spirituality, and the powerful connection they have to well-being.

Last year, the American Psychological Association revealed that the use of prayer for health concerns significantly increased from forty-three percent in 2002 to forty-nine percent in 2007.

Many studies have examined the effectiveness of prayer. Most of these studies state that prayer improves health. Some suggest otherwise.

Why the confusion?

If you analyzed the effects of 100 different medications used to treat a specific problem, you wouldn’t declare, “Medicine does not work!” if only one was found to be beneficial for treating the problem. Most likely, you would say, “Here is the one that helps.”

Just as all medications are not the same, not all prayers are the same.

I wrote in a column two weeks ago: “It would be difficult to grasp the complete driving ability of the 2012 Mercedes-Benz C-Class coupe if the test-drivers were fifteen-year-olds from your neighborhood driver education class. Just so, each test subject during a study of prayer’s ability to heal may not, as yet, be spiritually prepared to apply the full might of divine power.” Jesus’ disciples couldn’t always heal as quickly or completely as he did. Yet, the Bible implies that as they gained spiritual maturity some were able to perform many substantial cures.

Utilizing prayer under all circumstances is not always an easy task. After I married my wife, Joanne, and whenever I got the hiccups, a race for relief would break out between my prayer and her home-remedy of a spoonful of jelly. If I couldn't make the hiccups disappear through prayer before Joanne arrived with her spoon, I was supposed to swallow the sugary solution.

However, absolutely every time, prayer won out. Praying caused the hiccups to completely stop before Joanne could dash to the kitchen and return with the jelly.

I don't know if you have ever tried praying while under pressure, but it took a concerted effort to keep my thought on the divine power to bring relief while hearing Joanne's shoes on the tile floor as she ran to the kitchen.

Rather than being intimidated when hearing the sound of our utensil drawer opening, the silverware clanging, the drawer slamming shut, the refrigerator door opening and closing, and Joanne sprinting back with the spoonful of jelly, I’d endeavor to feel the spiritual conviction of a divine love and law at work.

Our family-friendly contest probably won't ever be seen as scientific evidence of prayer’s healing ability. It may not carry much weight in the growing understanding of the relevance of spirituality’s impact on health. And I don’t even expect leading researchers, medical educators, or experts on the relationship between spirituality and health to come knocking at our door to learn more of our experience.

Yet, prayer's success rate in our competition does tell me something, even though it may be shrugged off as anecdotal. I recognize a consistent pattern of betterment when I combine my hiccups vanishing with other health outcomes that prayer has produced. I have seen skin cancer, alcohol poisoning, kidney failure, and many other conditions cured.

Although the success rate of all healing methods humanity uses is not perfect, the endeavor to alleviate pain and suffering is commendable. As long as there is an urgency for health, the evaluation of spiritual methods will accelerate. Every advance is a needed and positive step.

– Keith Wommack is a Syndicated Columnist, Christian Science practitioner and teacher, husband, and step-dad. He has been described as a spiritual spur (since every horse needs a little nudge now and then). Keith’s columns originate at: keithwommack.com

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Essentials for better physical & financial health
by KeithWommack
Aug 13, 2012 | 825 views | 0 0 comments | 68 68 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

How often do you better your health and save money at the same time? I know. Never.

Yet, through some health care plans, it seems possible. Some plans include unique programs that will reward you for taking meaningful actions toward enhancing health.

Within good-health-behavior reward plans, an individual can earn up to $300 a year for participating in a coaching program or for meeting recommended health guidelines.

Eat healthy foods, get regular physical activity, abstain from tobacco use, -- these are some of the suggested steps often recommended to stay healthy. However, there may be pieces of the puzzle missing from health care plans and healthy lifestyle choices that you could benefit from.

Last September, Robert P. Faraci, MD, a principal with Medical Care Consultants, gave public testimony about health care before a Health System Reform Task Force of the Utah legislature. Faraci suggested that he may have stumbled upon a missing puzzle piece to the health care delivery equation. His testimony centers on his discovery that when it comes to health care, an important element is spiritual care.

Faraci practiced general surgery for 20 years. Later he became the Chief Medical Officer for a managed care plan in Denver, Colorado. Faraci was one of the executives of the plan who began investigating the mind-body aspects of disease and health care. His investigation directly led this plan to becoming the first HMO in the United States to offer spiritual care as a benefit.

Faraci stated before the Utah legislature, “In the course of my research, I discovered that spiritual beliefs have profound effects on patient outcomes. Furthermore, my own anecdotal experiences as a surgeon supported this conclusion.”

“Our research indicated that people with strong spiritual beliefs often had better medical outcomes than those who did not have such beliefs. Subsequent studies at Duke and Harvard Medical Schools and a comprehensive review by the Mayo clinic have reinforced these findings.”

Faraci continued, “We also discovered that people wanted this benefit. A John Templeton study revealed that 55% of Americans said they would choose a health plan that included spirituality and religious healing practices over a plan that did not. Finally, we felt that the addition of spirituality to our members’ care might lead to better clinical outcomes and, as a result, lower utilization of other resources.”

When other resources were utilized less, the company would save money. Therefore, they were able to offer the plan at a reasonable price, enabling members to keep their dollars in their wallets.

If you learned that there was a beneficial plan that acknowledged your spiritual beliefs and practice, wouldn’t you want to sign up for it?

Dr. Faraci quickly found that there was a huge demand for this spiritual benefit plan and the demand exceeded anything this managed care group could have imagined. It resulted in a doubling of their plan membership in the first year and doubling again in the second.

Faraci closed his testimony by sharing with the Utah legislature the likely results if a spirituality benefit were to be included in health plans of state Health Exchanges:

It could be added to the health plans at little to no increase in premium

It could potentially improve clinical outcomes

It will give members a stronger sense of well-being

It will make members happier with their health plans because mind, body and spirit have been addressed.

Perhaps, recognition of the bonuses spirituality brings to the health care table will bring an even greater interest in how spirituality heals minds and bodies. The care of each individual is of the utmost importance. And spiritual treatment has been shown not only to improve health but also to give relief from the tremendous financial burden imposed by other forms of care.

When examining the essentials needed to better health and to do it in a financially prudent way, don’t forget to consider spirituality. Many feel that it can provide you with the best rewards.

– Keith Wommack is a Syndicated Columnist, Christian Science practitioner and teacher, husband, and step-dad. He has been described as a spiritual spur (since every horse needs a little nudge now and then). Keith’s columns originate at: KeithWommack.com

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Is spiritual-based healing weird?
by KeithWommack
Aug 06, 2012 | 751 views | 0 0 comments | 51 51 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

While in a meeting, a newspaper editor, after learning that I practiced spiritual-based healing, said, "Since Christian Science is weird, it ... "

The editor stopped mid-sentence, looked at me, and said, "Oh, I'm so sorry. I didn't mean to say weird. I'm so sorry."

After the editor apologized several more times, I said, "Forget about it. It's okay," and we went back to our pleasant discussion.

The editor's "Weird" comment reminded me of '73. In 1973, I was in Brad Shearer's kitchen. Brad and I attended high school together. He was a star football player who went on to play for the Texas Longhorns and the Chicago Bears.

While in Brad's kitchen, I watched as he took a large glass measuring cup and cracked eight eggs into it. After whipping the eggs, he opened the door of a small machine, placed the measuring cup inside, closed the door, and turned a dial.  A minute or so later, he opened the door, took out the cup, and began eating the eggs with a fork. Weird!

Weird, because in '73 I had never heard of, much less, seen a microwave oven. How did those eggs cook in just a minute?

Just as the microwave seemed weird to me in '73, the thought of providing prayer for illness or pain can seem the same to you when you first encounter it. However, both are effective. Both utilize laws. The microwave transforms food. Spiritual treatments can transform people. Both accomplish this from the inside out.

The microwave oven cooks by a completely different method than a conventional oven. It uses radio waves. The waves are absorbed by the food's water, fats and sugars. As they are absorbed, the waves convert into atomic motion -- heat. This heat cooks the food.

Just so, spiritual treatments heal by transforming thought. Heats it up, so to speak. The cold/dark fears of materialistic thinking, which cause difficulties, melt and vanish allowing our natural strength, balance, and health to be experienced.

As radical as it sounds, we live in a mental world and the body is thought manifest. Simply put, just as a sad thought causes tears, thought touches every aspect of our being. As thought is spiritually transformed, the body expresses greater health.

Those looking into how Jesus healed so effectively are discovering life to be controlled by divine laws, and health to be governed spiritually. Weird to some. Wonderfully important to many.

Researches at the Danish Pain Research Center, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark, recently revealed the findings from their study on prayer. They discovered that "prayer reduced pain intensity by 34 percent and pain unpleasantness by 38 percent for religious participants, but not for non-religious participants." The study shows that prayerful expectations can contribute to better health outcomes.

Studying the effectiveness of prayer is not easy. The reason? Just as not all medications are the same, not all prayers are the same.

Neither are people who pray entirely the same. It would be difficult to grasp the complete driving ability of the 2012 Mercedes-Benz C-Class coupe if the test-drivers were fifteen-year-olds from your neighborhood driver education class. Just so, each test subject during a study of prayer’s ability may not be spiritually prepared to apply the full might of divine power.

There is much to be learned about the impact prayer-based healing can have on humanity. However, from what I have witnessed, spiritual practices are gaining momentum.

I use a microwave daily. I rely on prayer as a first choice for healing. Each has become a natural thing to do.

– Keith Wommack is a Syndicated Columnist, Christian Science practitioner and teacher, husband, and step-dad. He has been described as a spiritual spur (since every horse needs a little nudge now and then). Keith’s columns originate at: KeithWommack.com

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An Olympic edge
by KeithWommack
Jul 30, 2012 | 763 views | 0 0 comments | 56 56 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

The London games have begun. Does your favorite athlete have a leg up? Are they aware of the latest formula for speed? The newest way to win?

The development of bigger and stronger bodies brought many record-setting Olympic performances in the past. However, some feel the growth spurt is waning.

France's National Institute of Sport, Expertise, and Performance examined track and field and swimming events from 1891 to 2008 and reported that record-breaking performances have declined sharply since 1988. They concluded, “Our physiological evolution will remain limited in a majority of Olympic events."

With the decline in physiological evolutionary advancement and more consistent programs of nutrition and training, there has been a leveling of the playing field, so to speak. This has increased demand for the utilization of new ways to improve performances.

NPR recently aired the story Technology Could Give Athletes An Edge At Olympic Park. The piece included a discussion with Philippa Oldham of The Institution of Mechanical Engineers. Oldham explained how technologies such as spray-on clothing and 3D-printed shoes are assisting Olympians.

Greg Bishop in a New York Times piece Long Before London Games, James Bond Tactics explains that France even created an agency in its sports ministry to boost medal counts through athletic surveillance.

Bishop writes, “France is not the only nation looking for an Olympic edge through stealth. Someone from the United States’ cycling team surreptitiously rode the competition course in London for this summer’s Olympic Games with a three-dimensional mapping device, specifics of which officials declined to reveal, so the Americans could build and train on a replica of the Olympic track.”

Aerodynamic bicycle helmet designs, hydrodynamic swimwear, carbon fiber blades used for prosthetic limbs, and running shoe spikes that grip the track more efficiently, will provide athletes an edge until each team employs them or they are banned from Olympic use.

Does it make you wonder who and what is more important, engineers, gear, or the athletes?

If competition were merely comprised of physical movements, mechanical engineers would hold all the cards when it comes to Olympic medal counts. Yet, there is a mental component to athletics. And many feel that sports psychology outweighs the mechanical manipulations of clothing and gear.

However, besides the physical and emotional elements that give athletes an edge, there is another element to consider.

Michele Joan D. Valbuena, Associate Professor at the Department of Psychology, Silliman University, Dumaguete City, writes, “Sport psychology researchers have found that athlete engagement is characterized by 4 dimensions: confidence, dedication, vigor and enthusiasm.”

Yet, her research with Filipino athletes shows that there is a very helpful fifth dimension. Valbuena found that since Filipino athletes are not furnished with facilities and programs that other countries athletes are accustomed to, nor are they given financial assistance, a "fifth dimension of athletic engagement — spirituality — becomes their pillar."

The new Olympic edge might be the spiritual power that enables an athlete to cope with the rigors and stress of top-tier competition, and to recover more quickly from injuries.

This new edge probably doesn’t seem so new to many of us. Forty-nine percent of Americans say they already pray about their health. Thirty-six percent say they have witnessed the healing of an injury or illness because of prayer.

Several years ago, Cory, a sophomore pitcher from The University of Texas Longhorn varsity baseball squad was a student in my Christian Science Sunday School class. I had the opportunity to watch Cory pitch several times. One day, during a game, a ball was hit directly at him. Cory caught the line drive with his bare hand.

The next day a coach noticed that his hand was swollen and he couldn't grip the ball. An x-ray revealed a fracture. Cory was scheduled to pitch again in 4 days. He wanted to be healed, and knew from experience that a prayerful, spiritual approach could enable him to quickly recover.

Cory had planned to take a seven-hour trip to his girlfriend's cottage. Despite the injury, Cory followed through with his plans. While he travelled, he prayed, and as he did, he was convinced that changes were taking place. When he arrived, he knew the healing was complete. He went swimming and fishing, and wrestled with his girlfriend's brothers.

To satisfy his coach, he went back to the doctor who had x-rayed the hand. The doctor said he’d never seen anything like it. The hand was totally healed. When he pitched a few days later, he struck out seven of the eight batters he faced.

Spirituality enables athletes – everyone – to enjoy an edge, because it helps them both mentally and physically.

– Keith Wommack is a Syndicated Columnist, Christian Science practitioner and teacher, husband, and step-dad. He has been described as a spiritual spur (since every horse needs a little nudge now and then). Keith’s columns originate at: KeithWommack.com

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For success (and health), mind matters most
by KeithWommack
Jul 23, 2012 | 194 views | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

It is amazing what people can do when they utilize the might of mind.

Recently, Nik Wallenda grabbed a lot of headlines by becoming the first person in 116 years to walk a tightrope across the Niagara Gorge, and the first ever to stroll right over the falls.

Wallenda is reported to have said that he accomplished the feat through “a lot of praying, that's for sure. But, you know, it's all about the concentration, the focus, and the training.”

In my own experience, although I’ve never considered walking over the Niagara Gorge, much less my backyard pool, I’ve found that concentration, focus, and training are quite necessary for health and success.

More on that later.

Another individual who succeeds at what most of us don’t even contemplate is Chrissie Wellington, 4-time triathlon World Ironman champion.

In an article for CNN, speaking on how she does what she does, Wellington explained, “Of all the body parts we train, none is more important than the mind. ...it's when the discomfort strikes that [you] realize a strong mind is the most powerful weapon of all. I believe that it is my mind that has carried me through to some of my greatest victories.”

Although, I don’t walk tightrope or participate in triathlons as Wellington does, I am learning quite a lot about this “most powerful weapon of all.”

Again, I’ll dig a little deeper on this in a moment.

I’m not sure if Marc B. Lewis bikes and swims. However, I do know he writes. And in a Huffington Post article Does Your Mind Impact Your Health? Lewis wrote, “In a discussion of health, wellness and well-being, an important concept is the relationship between the mind and the body.”

He examined what he called the “two primary ways of looking at the mind-body relationship.” He explained that Monism is the view that the mind and body are not “distinct entities” but “one interrelated system.” The opposite or dualism model suggests that the mind and body never impact one another.

I do believe that both Wallenda and Wellington might be supportive of the Monism theory. I am.

Lewis further wrote, “If the monism principle … is correct, you likely notice changes in your body that correlate with what you think and the emotions you experience. Since your mind and emotions impact the conditions in your body and the conditions in your body are a factor in the manifestation of disease and illness, your mind and emotions are a major player in determining your health and wellness.”

If you are finding mind to be a "major player" in your experience, you're not alone.

Harris Dienstfrey in an essay in Consciousness & Healing: Integral Approaches To Mind-Body Medicine, has written, “I hope this is clear. There is as yet no bottom to the well of the mind’s capacity to do in the body (some bodies) what any newly invented drug can do. The problem the drug is treating does not matter. The mind is expansive enough to treat the problem. Put it this way: The mind so far can do (for some people) what all the pharmaceutical labs of the world together haven’t been able to do.”

If you are keeping count, you’ve seen mind described as “a major player” and as “the most powerful weapon of all.” You’ve read that mind can accomplish “what all the pharmaceutical labs of the world together haven’t been able to do.” Yet, is it really the human mind that is such a dominant power?

The human mind can do a lot of things. However, perhaps you are finding, like I am, that no matter the training, focus, or concentration given, the human mind, by itself, cannot motivate and drive you to experience sustained success or health.

Possibly, you are discovering, as I am, that instead of the human mind being a powerhouse that possesses unstoppable abilities, in fact, it achieves success and promotes health only to the degree that it humbly embraces and reflects a divine consciousness.

The Bible describes Jesus as a master of both health and success. Did his accomplishments come about because of a human mind and will or was it an outcome of his subordination to the divine?

I believe that it is the latter, indicating that health and success are achieved by our growing awareness of a higher consciousness. A productive mind stems from a divinely governed mind.

I have found that if you prayerfully train your thought with focused concentration, acknowledging the spiritual nature of existence, you can experience the success and health you hope for, -- your hard work will pay off. Your mind and body will be animated to act in the direction that the divine wisely and carefully points out.

– Keith Wommack is a Syndicated Columnist, Christian Science practitioner and teacher, husband, and step-dad. He has been described as a spiritual spur (since every horse needs a little nudge now and then). Keith’s columns originate at: http://texashealthblog.com/

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Happiness Improves Your Health
by KeithWommack
Jul 16, 2012 | 1068 views | 1 1 comments | 54 54 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
Early in 2011, while Bob and I were waiting for an elevator at the VA Hospital in West Los Angeles, Bob began chatting with someone walking by. While the two of them were deep in conversation, a retired general stepped up and asked, “Are you with Bob?”

I said, “Yes, I’m his son-in-law.”

The general looked me in the eye, as possibly only generals can do, reached out, took hold of my shirtsleeve, and said, “That man makes life worth living.” He meant it.

After the elevator ride and a stroll to the bus stop, I helped Bob onto the bus for a ride over to another VA building. Once he was seated on the bus and happily waving to me, the bus driver came over, started shaking his head, as possibly only bus drivers who have seen-it-all can do, and said, “He is the greatest. He always brightens my day.” He also meant it.

It’s hard to believe that almost a year has passed since we celebrated Bob’s ninety-three years at his full-military-honored memorial service.

Robert Milne Yates, or Bob as most everyone knew him, was a walking dispensary of joy. Everywhere he went he touched lives. Perhaps, we could say that he was a healer, of sorts.

Why should we consider Bob a healer? I doubt he would ever think of himself in that way, yet, conceivably, we could because of the recognized connection between happiness and health.

Bob had a gift of spreading happiness. He was an entertainer. He loved an audience. He met no strangers. He always had a kind word for everyone and took a genuine interest in the lives of those he met. Something said would remind him of a joke or a one-liner and then another. He made everyone smile when he came into a room. When you heard laughter, it was usually Bob’s fault.

In making the case for considering Bob a healer, perhaps I should toss the findings of researchers into the mix. The physical health benefits of laughter have been reported as boosting immunity, lowering stress hormones, decreasing pain, relaxing muscles, and preventing heart disease.

Additionally, studies have shown the mental health benefits of laughter to be increased zest for life, easing of anxiety and fear, relief from stress, improved mood, and enhanced resilience.

When I think of all the people impacted by Bob’s jokes and jovial nature, it is hard for me to calculate the positive mental and physical health outcomes he may have unknowingly brought about.

From 1938 to 1941 Bob lived in the Los Angeles area, playing drums with various orchestras and working as a musician in movies at MGM, 20th Century Fox, and Universal Studios.

He served in the United States Army during World War II, from 1941 to 1945. In addition to his weapon, he carried a set of drumsticks as he and the First Armored Division Band entertained fellow soldiers in Ireland, England, North Africa, and Italy.

Unfortunately, while in North Africa, Bob was injured while diving into a foxhole to avoid enemy fire. He was honorably discharged from the Army and returned to California to bring smiles to those he influenced while filming movies, playing nightclub shows, working in retail for years, and while being a friend to his neighbors.

Further, in making the case for considering Bob a healer are the results found by researchers Nicholas Christakis, a professor of medical sociology at Harvard Medical School in Boston, and James Fowler, a political scientist at the University of California, San Diego. The 2008 work done by these two researchers and some of their colleagues assessed happiness from a twenty-year study that evaluated data from over 4,700 participants.

The introduction to their research findings, states, in part, “The World Health Organization is increasingly emphasizing happiness as a component of health. …People can ‘catch’ emotional states they observe in others over time frames ranging from seconds to weeks.”

The study’s conclusion reads, “People’s happiness depends on the happiness of others with whom they are connected. This provides further justification for seeing happiness, like health, as a collective phenomenon.”

Perhaps no governing body will ever throw a posthumous doctoral degree Bob's way. And agreeably everyone who spreads joy and cracks jokes shouldn't necessarily hang out their pharmaceutical shingle. Yet, bottom line – even though he may never have been in the same comedic league as Ellen DeGeneres or Robin Williams, I believe Bob deserves to be remembered and admired as someone who enriched lives, worldwide. I can say his overall motive was to bring a degree of genuine respect and happiness to others.

If you can touch the heart of a general and soul of a bus driver, you have done some good.

Time spent with Bob was more than fun moments filled with family, laughter, and smiles. These were hours where I experienced the full benefits of happiness.

A quote from Mary Baker Eddy, Christian author noted for her ideas about spirituality and health, perhaps sums up the feelings of those who knew Bob and his contributions to society. Eddy wrote, "The sublime summary of an honest life satisfies the mind craving a higher good, and bathes it in the cool waters of peace on earth; till it grows into the full stature of wisdom, reckoning its own by the amount of happiness it has bestowed upon others.”

The affect of Bob's joy on others encourages me to continue exploring the fundamentally mental nature of life, and the mental as well as spiritual way that health can be improved and reliably maintained.

– Keith Wommack is a Syndicated Columnist, Christian Science practitioner and teacher, husband, and step-dad. He has been described as a spiritual spur (since every horse needs a little nudge now and then). Keith’s columns originate at: http://texashealthblog.com/

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DubiousForever
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July 16, 2012
Laughter truly is the best medicine...LOL!

Respect required for well-being
by KeithWommack
Jul 09, 2012 | 343 views | 1 1 comments | 14 14 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

Respect, it’s grabbing a lot of attention lately, and deservedly so.

New research shows respect, not money, buys happiness.

This new research by psychological scientist Cameron Anderson and his colleagues at the Haas School of Business at the University of California, Berkeley, looked into the relationship between different types of status and well-being. Their findings indicate overall happiness is associated with how much you are respected and regarded by others, not your monetary status. Apparently, cash is not always king.

Paul Meshanko in The Respect Effect: Leveraging Culture, Emotions and Neuroscience to Build a Better Business, explores the transformational power of respect in the workplace.

Meshanko reveals that when employees are treated with respect, the results are better health and well-being for the organization as well as the individual. When companies treat employees disrespectfully, the incivility can cost them dearly. Litigation, sagging productivity, insufficient employee engagement, and distrust in company leaders can be the result. Evidently, when respect is missing, everyone loses.

In Effects of Respect TJ Davis reveals the importance of Elder care facilities, from nursing homes to assisted living residences, improving the respect shown their clients.

Davis’ story on Elder care facilities reveals that despite enforced guidelines for the physical care and treatment of elders in facilities, “many elder care workers may not be providing the level of respect they think they are [giving].”

“Treating the resident with the respect he or she deserves and encouraging independent activity can make a huge difference in the recovery time for individuals recuperating from injury or surgery.”

These examples are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to respect that impacts well-being.

Respect from others is unmistakably tied to the amount of self-respect we acknowledge for ourselves. Self-respect also plays an important role in well-being.

Self-respect could be seen as being grateful and comfortable with our life and identity. It influences our desires, values, emotions, and actions. I have found that when individuals express a greater sense of spiritual contentment they also have a greater sense of self-respect, and this helps maintain their mental and physical health. Those with a healthy sense of self-respect are less tortured by blame, guilt, regret, and stress. Reducing these emotions can help prevent health problems.

Ok, what is the secret to gaining self-respect? I believe, the secret is realizing that it may seem to be dormant, but it has always been accessible because it is Spirit-based.

Respect could be thought of as a divine scent found in the fabric of your conscious being. It remains strong while you remain close to Spirit. The fragrance, with each compassionate word or act of kindness, reminds us that Spirit is ever-present although unseen.

In my healing practice, I have found that when I sincerely respect others, it helps them experience health improvements, both emotionally and physically.

What do I mean by respecting others?

Good friends look past one another’s occasional flippant or hurtful comments, knowing that the comments don’t really reflect how they feel about each other. In the same manner, I respect another as I recognize the value of his or her spiritual nature. Since health is ultimately thought governed, my affirmation of the individual’s divine worth erases the fears and materialistic beliefs that hide health and confidence.

The healing benefits and improvements caused by the transformational power of respect have proven to me the necessity for spirituality in regard to humanity's health care.

Whether it is happiness you’re looking for, a work environment needing help, or your own or another’s physical health needing assistance, apparently, respect is required. It can be an important ingredient to your well-being.

– Keith Wommack is a Syndicated Columnist, Christian Science practitioner and teacher, husband, and step-dad. He has been described as a spiritual spur (since every horse needs a little nudge now and then). Keith’s columns originate at: http://texashealthblog.com/

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DubiousForever
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July 09, 2012
There are even songs about it.

When Your Physician Cares
by KeithWommack
Jul 02, 2012 | 1031 views | 0 0 comments | 50 50 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

If you were made, assembled, like a car or truck, there would be no need for compassion and care when it came to your health needs, to fixing you up. Switch out a part or two, bang out a dent when needed, and you would be good to go.

Yet, you know there is more to you than body parts, and health care means more than just cleaning out a filter and changing spark plugs, so to speak.

Francis W. Peabody, M.D., in 1927, wrote The Care of the Patient. Peabody’s piece is one of the most recounted articles in medical literature. In part, he penned, “The good physician knows his patients through and through, and his knowledge is bought dearly. Time, sympathy and understanding must be lavishly dispensed, but the reward is to be found in that personal bond which forms the greatest satisfaction of the practice of medicine. One of the essential qualities of the clinician is interest in humanity, for the secret of the care of the patient is in caring for the patient.”

Here in 2012, really knowing the patient “through and through,” should, to some degree, include the healer being aware of a patient’s mental and spiritual needs.

‪‪In 2002, editors Raymond F. Paloutzian, PhD and Crystal L. Park, PhD published the Handbook Of The Psychology Of Religion And Spirituality. They brought together prominent scholars who surveyed research in the connection between health, thought, and spirituality.

Paloutzian and Park wrote, "The present is a very exciting time for the emerging transdisciplinary field of religion, spirituality, and health. Research findings are slowly coalescing into a coherent picture of how the human body and human health are affected by the perennial human quest in various forms for spiritual and religious truth. Many psychologists and religionists, but perhaps not enough, are moving beyond earlier mutual stereotypes and learning to collaborate. Only through such collaboration, we believe, can we apply the fullest range of knowledge and wisdom to fostering human health and well-being in the context of today’s dire global needs."

Eight years later, Dr. Larry Dossey, former Chief of Staff of Medical City Dallas Hospital, writing for The Huffington Post, reported, “A survey of American family physicians found that 99 percent are convinced that spiritual beliefs can heal, and 75 percent believe that prayers of others can help a patient recover. A recent survey of over 4,000 nurses found that 80 percent felt that spirituality should be covered in nurse education as a core aspect of nursing.”

All through the years, there have been practitioners from many modalities of healing that have applied spiritual techniques in their healing arts. We may not understand each of these healing methods, but perhaps you and I could agree that care, which expresses a measure of love, can brighten even the darkest moments in a sufferer’s struggle for comfort. Love heals.

In the late eighties, I attended a talk by Gordan Clarke, a Christian Science practitioner from Milwaukee, Wisconsin. In the lecture, Clarke explained how a woman had come to his office looking like the "perfect presentation of a Walt Disney witch." He said she was disheveled, dark in her expression and disposition. The woman came to him for relief from a physical ailment.

Clarke took the case, and shared with the woman what he felt were meaningful, spiritual truths. Previously, in his practice, he had see that when the facts about a patient’s spiritual nature were understood and affirmed, mental and physical relief came.

He prayed for the woman and felt he was feeding her with spiritual inspiration. After several visits and discussions, the woman simply turned to him with teary eyes and said, "If you would only love me, I know I would be healed."

Her statement shocked him. Hadn't he been loving her, caring for her in his prayerful treatment for her all along? Or, on the contrary, had he been merely seeing a poor soul that needed what he had to offer?

He was humbled. Then he felt love pouring into him and out from him to this woman. She, like so many of us, was in need, not only of physical healing, but of the most vital comforting antidote: loving care.

He loved her, not with pity but with compassion and tender respect. He attempted to love her, to some degree, as he knew God loved her.

The next time the woman returned to his office, not only was she physically healed, Clarke said that her whole face had changed. She no longer looked like a Walt Disney witch. She was open, and bright, and lovely.

Nothing facilitates betterment more than the heartfelt and thoughtful care of a practitioner.

It brings added significance to Peabody’s assertion, “One of the essential qualities of the clinician is interest in humanity,” when you begin to glimpse tender care to be one of the paramount foundation stones of humanity. Knowing this, you further realize that, possibly, spiritual love is a required ingredient in the prevention of diseases as well as their cure.

I’ve heard that a wise physician once said to his patient, "I've been practicing medicine for 30 years, and have prescribed many things. But in the long run I've learned that, for most of what ails the human creature the best medicine is love."  When asked, "What if it doesn't work?" He answered, "Double the dose."

When your physician cares, you are probably receiving their very best.

– Keith Wommack is a Syndicated Columnist, Christian Science practitioner and teacher, husband, and step-dad. He has been described as a spiritual spur (since every horse needs a little nudge now and then). Keith’s columns originate at: http://texashealthblog.com/

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Key Factor To Health – Your Thought
by KeithWommack
Jun 25, 2012 | 945 views | 0 0 comments | 17 17 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

Did you know your thoughts affect your health? Really impact you physically? You’ve heard it said we live in a mental world. The indications that support this statement are many.

Case in point:

In the post Your Birthday Can Kill You Newsmax Health shares interesting details from research published in the Annals of Epidemiology. “Overall, the research revealed a 13.8 percent greater probability people will die on the day they were born, said the report.”

If fixating on your birthday causes stress and/or readies you “for a possible major life event on that day,” can’t you assume your thought is a key factor to your health?

As well, Russ Gerber in a Huffingtonpost article The Next Big Decision on Health Care May Be Your Own, relates that:

  • Approximately 70 percent of medical students experience the symptoms of the diseases they are studying (known as "medical student's disease").
  • Study after study has shown the physiological effect caused by a patient's belief -- the expectation of improvement (placebo) or harm (nocebo) -- in an inert substance.
  • Similar symptoms appear in an individual when he or she sees or learns of the sickness of another, also known as psychogenic illness, or mass hysteria.
  • Ruminating over the heavily-promoted expectation of danger (fear) can be hazardous to your health.

Isn’t it in fact a mental world if unhealthy thinking causes illness? And, if unhealthy thinking causes illness, even death, but healthy thinking can promote and protect your health, then shouldn’t you, by all means, think healthy?

What is healthy thinking? Believe it or not, in my Christian and mental healing practice, I’ve found that the less you think about the body the better. When overly concerned with the body, you may not be recognizing the real you.

The prescription of a master healer some 2000 years ago was this: Do not worry about your life, what you will eat or what you will drink; nor about your body, what you will put on.” This radical-care plan of Jesus’ never ignored anyone’s physical or mental problems. Just the opposite; the Bible indicates that Jesus had a stellar track record when it came to caring for the sick.

Perhaps Jesus’ success centered on his ability to focus on the spiritual selfhood of those needing help. Could this mean that a more spiritual focus allows God’s love and spiritual laws to govern you mentally and physically?

Research seems to indicate that spiritual awareness does promote health.

For example, Jeff Levin, in his book God, Faith, and Health: Exploring the Spirituality Healing Connection, writes, “The best study conducted to date on the topic of religious attendance and health found the most amazing results. It showed that the protective effects of frequent participation in church can last a lifetime. … Published in the American Journal of Public Health, [one] study found that frequent religious attenders had greater survival rates — that is, lower mortality — that extended over a twenty-eight-year period. Frequent religious attendance in 1965 was still reducing the risk of dying in 1994.”

Another health explorer is finding thought to be an important key to your health:

Lissa Rankin, MD, in a blog post You’re Healed If You Think You Are, writes, “As research for my upcoming book Mind Over Medicine: Scientific Proof You Can Heal Yourself, I have been digging deep into the medical literature, going back as far as the 1920’s into medical journals in order to find cold, hard science to prove what I have long believed – that we hold within us self-healing superpowers that are stronger than any chemotherapy and more effective than any surgery. …Your state of mind greatly affects the state of your body.”

Since it appears that your thought is a key factor to your health, it may benefit you the most to contemplate the body less and health and happiness more. Consider recognizing yourself as healthy because spiritual facts declare that you are. Your spiritual thinking just may be that healing superpower.

– Keith Wommack is a Syndicated Columnist, Christian Science practitioner and teacher, husband, and step-dad. He has been described as a spiritual spur (since every horse needs a little nudge now and then). Keith’s columns originate at: http://texashealthblog.com/

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Quantum solace - science and health
by KeithWommack
Jun 18, 2012 | 1003 views | 0 0 comments | 22 22 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

Many years ago, I taught Michelle in Sunday School. A few years later, when she was a teenager, she went to a party and drank until she was drunk. Friends took her to a house and left her alone for several hours. When they returned at 3:30 in the morning, they found her unconscious and not breathing.

When firemen were unable to revive her, she was immediately taken to a hospital. At the hospital she was found to have alcohol poisoning and wasn't expected to live.

When Jill, Michelle's mom, arrived at the hospital, Michelle was comatose and on a number of life support machines. A doctor told Jill that Michelle had an alcohol content of .5 in her system. "At .1 you're drunk," he said, ".4 is usually fatal." He also said he did not think they could save her. He stated that even if she did survive, she would suffer brain damage because of being deprived of oxygen for so long. He also stated that damage to her lungs was irreparable.

After hearing these dire predictions, Jill began to pray and called on me to do so too. I began praying immediately and continued as I drove to the hospital. When I arrived, Jill was overjoyed. Michelle had awakened from the coma, and all life support systems had been removed. I was able to speak with both Michelle and her mom. As you can imagine, Michelle's friends were also relieved. They had been feeling guilty for leaving her alone.

A doctor confirmed that Michelle was out of danger from the alcohol poisoning and that there were no signs of brain damage, but he was still extremely concerned. He expected pneumonia to set in. We all continued praying. A day later, her lungs were examined and found to be fine -- no indication of pneumonia was present. Then the doctor released her with the staff calling her "the miracle girl."

Did Michelle experience a miracle or something natural?

If her healing was accomplished by an isolated moment of exalted inspiration or blind faith then, perhaps, Michelle’s experience could be considered a miracle. However, spiritual healing, as I know it, rests on understanding and demonstration. It includes scientific discovery and divine revelation.

It seems more and more people are becoming aware that spiritual healing is not only natural; it is reasonable and responsible care. For example: a survey of American family physicians found that 99 percent of these physicians are convinced that spiritual beliefs can heal. Further, 75 percent believe that the prayers of others can help a patient recover more quickly. Also, a Pew Research survey revealed that 36 percent of Americans say they’ve experienced or seen healing through prayer.

Explaining how a spiritually mental activity can produce changes in physical bodies is not an easy task due to the strong conviction that our thought is servant to our body. Yet, more than ever, it is being discovered that existence is more consciousness-based than believed.

As we ponder health as being more mental in nature, spiritual healing may be considered as coinciding with certain elements found in quantum mechanics. For instance, in the introduction of his book, Taking the Quantum Leap, Fred Alan Wolf, former professor of physics at San Diego State University, states "...quantum mechanics indicates that there is an order to the universe. It simply isn't the order we expected. Even describing the true order of the universe is difficult because it involves something more than the physical world. It involves us, our minds, and our thoughts."

Wolf continues, “Just how physics and our minds are to be brought together is a controversial subject. The gradual recognition that what we think may physically influence what we observe has led to a revolution in thought and philosophy, not to mention physics.”

So how does Wolf’s statement possibly agree with a Bible or spiritually-based treatment?

My experience has shown me that prayer improves physical conditions because the essential nature of existence is thought. Although it seems otherwise, thought, or consciousness, is the master of the body. In fact, thought constitutes the body rather than it being a machine.

Unlike a machine, the structure of human thought is able to change. However, the highest consciousness, the Mind that is God, doesn't change. It’s our concept of existence that is altered by prayer. Prayer brings our thought, and the body along with it, into the harmony that characterizes a God-governed consciousness.

Look at it this way: Imagine a football game where instead of the scoreboard changing because of actions taking place on a field, the play on the field adjusts according to merely revising the score.

Ross Rhodes, science writer and lecturer specializing in the philosophical implications of quantum mechanics, writes, "...the mathematical formulas that were initially developed to describe the behavior of the universe turn out to govern the behavior of the universe.

“It is as though you could create a good offense in a football game -- send the tight end racing down the sidelines and across the goal line -- by changing the numbers on the scoreboard. We are accustomed to thinking that the scoreboard describes and tallies the action on the field; in this analogy, we find that the action on the field is produced by the changing numbers on the scoreboard."

Spiritual healing should be considered natural instead of miraculous, if what we believe shapes our experience. Changes of thought (like changing the scoreboard) lead to adjustments in bodies and lives (like the action on the field).

Most importantly, though, a more spiritual consciousness will discern that we’ve always been in the hands of a loving and wise God.

After the doctor released Michelle, and as she was walking out, the firemen who'd rushed her to the hospital were walking in. They'd returned to find out when she had passed away. They were overjoyed to see Michelle alive.

And if I think about what Michelle's condition looked like to her friends or the firemen who rushed her to the hospital, perhaps darkness might describe it. Yet, our prayers for Michelle didn't ask the darkness how long it had been there, or how solid it seemed to be, or even how much momentum it'd built up. Our prayers glimpsed and acknowledged the light (God's presence). This action apparently removed the darkness.

Perhaps the solid substance and structure of existence is thought, God's thought, -- God seeing the goodness of His own creation. If this is so, then, possibly, each of our humble prayers enables us to view life from God's own perspective, to some degree. As we pray, we can witness God bringing love, health, and care to human conditions needing tender treatment.

– Keith Wommack is a Syndicated Columnist, Christian Science practitioner and teacher, husband, and step-dad. He has been described as a spiritual spur (since every horse needs a little nudge now and then). Keith’s columns originate at: http://texashealthblog.com/

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