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Passing of a ‘legend’
by Jason Collins
Nov 21, 2012 | 1891 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
On Thursday, Kirtly Wayne ‘Dude’ DuBose,  80, died of complications from Parkinson’s disease. DuBose was a retired educator and coach at Skidmore-Tynan ISD described as one who was respected by all who knew him.
On Thursday, Kirtly Wayne ‘Dude’ DuBose, 80, died of complications from Parkinson’s disease. DuBose was a retired educator and coach at Skidmore-Tynan ISD described as one who was respected by all who knew him.
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In 2009, The Skidmore-Tynan school district honored Kirtly Wayne ‘Dude’ DuBose by naming the gym in his honor. On Thursday, DuBose died of complications related to Parkinson’s disease. This photo was taken at the gym’s dedication. The events center at the school was later named for both he and his wife who dedicated their lives to teaching and coaching at the school.
Bee-Picayune file photo
In 2009, The Skidmore-Tynan school district honored Kirtly Wayne ‘Dude’ DuBose by naming the gym in his honor. On Thursday, DuBose died of complications related to Parkinson’s disease. This photo was taken at the gym’s dedication. The events center at the school was later named for both he and his wife who dedicated their lives to teaching and coaching at the school. Bee-Picayune file photo
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SKIDMORE — He is called a legend in the Skidmore-Tynan school district.

He dedicated his life to the students. And his devotion never went unnoticed.

The gym was named in his honor in 2009.

This past January, he and his wife were honored when the events center was named in their honor.

On Thursday, Kirtly Wayne “Dude” DuBose, 80, died of complications from Parkinson’s disease.

Born in Pawnee, DuBose lived much of his life in Bee County.

After graduation from Pawnee High, DuBose headed to Southwest Texas State Teachers College in San Marcos, and then onto earn his master’s of education from Texas A&I in Kingsville.

He married Mavournee Dominy on May 30, 1954.

After a brief stint in the Army, DuBose returned to the county and went to work at Skidmore-Tynan ISD as a teacher, coach and later as principal.

His family says that, although he enjoyed his teaching career and was proud to have been an administrator, he loved his time as a coach. Some of his most joyful moments were spent on the basketball court and at the track with his teams and, in later years, reminiscing about those moments.

Dr. Brett Belmarez

When Superintendent Dr. Brett Belmarez first met DuBose, he was still taking game stats for, among others, the Beeville Bee-Picayune.

“Everybody around here loved him. First and foremost, he cared about people.”

Belmarez said that what sticks out in his mind is the circumstances surrounding the naming the gym after DuBose.

“It came as a grass-roots effort from the school and community,” he said. “Very often with any grass-roots effort, you can always find people who disagree with the approach or idea.

“There wasn’t one dissenting voice.”

Belmarez didn’t know DuBose all that well, but he respected him because of the stories told to him by others.

“He is a legend and a great person, and we will miss him dearly,” he said.

David Ross

David Ross said that he was hired into the Skidmore-Tynan School District just four years after DuBose.

When he became superintendent in 1975, he said that DuBose was the logical choice to replace him as the high school principal.

“He was so devoted to the school and the school district,” he said.

Dedication to the kids — that sums up DuBose.

“I think the thing that I most felt good about was that, no matter where or what was going on, I always knew he was going to look out for those kids,” Ross said.

It was this dedication to the safety and well-being of the youth that always left Ross at ease when DuBose would take the students on field trips such as the senior trip to the Six Flags.

Ross said that even after DuBose retired, he spent much of his time at the games. “He was devoted to those kids,” Ross said.

Linda Naranjo Walls

Through the years, DuBose touched the lives of many a student.

Linda Naranjo Walls was a student athlete of his from the seventh grade on.

“He also was my driver’s education teacher, photography teacher, bus driver, principal and counselor,” she said.

“On our senior trip — yep, he was our sponsor and bus driver ­— he tricked us into riding the huge roller coaster at Six Flags Dallas,” she said.

As DuBose was leading the students through the park, he said, “It was a tradition to go on this path.”

She said, “So, we followed him and somehow ended up in line for the coaster.

“He told us there was no turning back, because the workers would not allow anyone to go back, so we had to ride.

“Even though we were terrified, we rode, because we trusted him.

“I rode my first huge roller coaster that day and to this day have a love of riding roller coasters.”

Funeral arrangements

Visitation with the family is Friday from 5 to 7 p.m. at Galloway and Sons Funeral Home in Beeville.

A celebration of his life is Saturday at 11 a.m. at the First Presbyterian Church in Beeville with the Rev. Linda Sherry officiating.

In celebrating Wayne’s life, the family asks that friends and family consider wearing one of his favorite team’s colors or clothes in lieu of traditional black; the Skidmore-Tynan Bobcats’ purple and gold, UT Longhorns’ burnt orange or the Houston Astros’ brick red, black and sand.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be given to the Joe and Ruth Lindsay Scholarship Fund, Skidmore-Tynan High School, P.O. Box 409, Skidmore, TX 78389; National Parkinson Foundation at www.parkinson.org; or the charity of your choice.

Jason Collins is the editor at the Bee-Picayune and can be reached at 358-2550, ext. 121, or at editor@mySouTex.com.
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