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Atop a Texas Longhorn
Oct 30, 2014 | 8 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
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A young cowboy seems very relaxed and right at home atop “Tumbleweed” the Longhorn Steer at the Karnes County Museum Complex in Helena Saturday during the annual Indian Summer Heritage Festival hosted by the Karnes County Historical Society and Karnes County Historical Commission. The event celebrates the history of Karnes County and Texas heritage and allows visitors the opportunity to walk through time through museum and area exhibits and entertainment.
Contributed photo A young cowboy seems very relaxed and right at home atop “Tumbleweed” the Longhorn Steer at the Karnes County Museum Complex in Helena Saturday during the annual Indian Summer Heritage Festival hosted by the Karnes County Historical Society and Karnes County Historical Commission. The event celebrates the history of Karnes County and Texas heritage and allows visitors the opportunity to walk through time through museum and area exhibits and entertainment.
slideshow
Contributed photo A young cowboy seems very relaxed and right at home atop “Tumbleweed” the Longhorn Steer at the Karnes County Museum Complex in Helena Saturday during the annual Indian Summer Heritage Festival hosted by the Karnes County Historical Society and Karnes County Historical Commission. The event celebrates the history of Karnes County and Texas heritage and allows visitors the opportunity to walk through time through museum and area exhibits and entertainment.
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Don Mueller displayed this plant tower for Portland Garden Club members Tuesday.
Don Mueller displayed this plant tower for Portland Garden Club members Tuesday.
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Club members learn to grow their own plant towers
by Shane Ersland
Oct 30, 2014 | 95 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Don Mueller displayed this plant tower for Portland Garden Club members Tuesday.
Don Mueller displayed this plant tower for Portland Garden Club members Tuesday.
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PORTLAND - Garden Club members learned how to make plant towers Tuesday at Portland’s First Christian Church. Don Mueller displayed a plant tower he had grown, and walked Garden Club members through the steps of growing their own. “The type of pot you use is important,” Mueller said. “It’s there to form a structure.” Mueller said a typical pot that is suitable for building a plant tower will cost around $35, and the total cost for building one will be between $80 and $100. “You could use a tomato planter, and turn it upside down,” Mueller said. “I don’t recommend plastic pots. There’s a lot of vertical gardening going on today. I’ve made a few for family and friends.” After a pot has been purchased, Mueller recommended installing a liner and a watering tool inside it, prior to placing plants in it. “I recommend putting something heavy in there if the pot is lightweight,” Mueller said. “Or, it’s going to end up being top heavy. You can put gravel in the bottom of the plant to help stabilize it.” Plants that are suitable for use with a plant tower include Periwinkle, English Ivy, and Begonias, Mueller said. Judy Nardini asked what the most difficult element about building plant towers is. “The hardest part can be planting the plants in there, and being patient,” Mueller said. “That’s the biggest problem.” Mueller noted the importance of conserving water while gardening, and said he recently spoke to City Manager Randy Wright about the possibility of introducing a program to residents that would involve saving rainwater. “I am proud to be able to have captured some of the rainwater we’ve had,” Mueller said. “I talked to the city manager about looking into that.”
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A crowd watches intently as video evidence of paranormal activity is played from recent ghost hunting excursions by the Ghost Hounds of South Texas. The group was talking to people Monday evening inside the McClanahan House.
A crowd watches intently as video evidence of paranormal activity is played from recent ghost hunting excursions by the Ghost Hounds of South Texas. The group was talking to people Monday evening inside the McClanahan House.
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This photo, taken through the sheer drapes of a window in the McClanahan House, shows the visitors learning a little more about what it takes to be a ghost hunter or paranormal investigator.
This photo, taken through the sheer drapes of a window in the McClanahan House, shows the visitors learning a little more about what it takes to be a ghost hunter or paranormal investigator.
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