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After surviving a South Korean meat market, a rescued dog finds solace in Portland
Jun 24, 2014 | 70 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The Mascorros relax at home with their foster dog, J.P., who was rescued after narrowly escaping being eaten in South Korea. Pictured, from left to right, are Layla, 8, J.P., Micah, 11, and Stephanie.
The Mascorros relax at home with their foster dog, J.P., who was rescued after narrowly escaping being eaten in South Korea. Pictured, from left to right, are Layla, 8, J.P., Micah, 11, and Stephanie.
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A young dog is now enjoying the comfortable confines of the Mascorro home in Portland, after narrowly escaping a terrible death in South Korea.

Gabriella Dalton found J.P. – a Jindo mix that was named by rescuers who decided he had hit the jackpot – at a meat market in Seoul. Many people raise and eat dogs there, and there are no laws in place that punish those involved in the trade. Dalton, whose husband is stationed in South Korea, bought J.P. from the market, and shipped him to America. J.P. landed in San Francisco, and then flew to San Antonio, where friends of Dalton’s picked him up June 18.

Bath & Biscuits owner and Last Chance Rescue member Lorena Lara helped J.P. find a foster home with Stephanie Mascorro. He will stay with her until a permanent home can be found for him.

“They didn’t want him to come into another kennel situation,” Mascorro said. “They wanted a more social situation.”

Mascorro said she was sympathetic to J.P.’s situation due to an occurrence she had while she was dining in a Malaysian restaurant when she was young.

“I saw cats getting skinned in the restaurant,” Mascorro said. “I’m familiar with how some people eat domestic animals. I kind of new the environment (J.P.) was living in. I felt a little bond there.”

Lara said Dalton is leading an initiative that includes other military members in South Korea who are working to rescue dogs that are in danger of being eaten.

“She’s heading up the rescue,” Lara said. “She has a year left before she comes back to the states. She will try to get as many out as she can. Another (dog) was recently flown into Seattle; a Golden Retriever.”

Mascorro said she would like to be involved with future rescues.

“I want to be able to serve as a person who can care for more dogs,” she said. “I want to serve as the intermediate person who can help with this effort. There’s nothing protecting them over there, so we’re serving as the voice for them.”

Dogs that are slated for consumption in South Korea are often subjected to torture before they are butchered.

“They torture them to rev them up, and get their adrenaline going,” Mascorro said. “They believe that makes the meat better, and makes them more tasty. They beat and electrocute them.”

When Dalton found J.P., he was living in cramped conditions with about 40 other dogs. Despite the cruel treatment he suffered at the hands of other people, Mascorro said he is adapting well to her family.

“You could see the fear he had, but he had no signs of aggression,” she said.

Last Chance Rescue will attempt to find J.P. a permanent home.

“He is still in need of a home,” Lara said. “We’re taking applications for his adoption.”
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