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Brit farmer breaks own onion record
by James White
Oct 25, 2012 | 595 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The pungent lily bulb commonly known as “onion” has a new heavyweight champion. A British resident named Glazebrook has grown and submitted an onion weighing 18 lbs., 1 oz. The previous record was 17 lbs., 15.5 oz. Mr. Glazebrook grew that one, too.

A bird enthusiast named Symmons of Devon, England was practicing bird calls in his backyard late one evening when one of his owl hoots was answered by an actual owl. Symmons hooted late into the night and many of his calls were answered. Symmons’ wife was later chatting with a neighbor (Mrs. Cornes) some two houses down and shared the exciting news about her husband’s owl calls. Mrs. Cornes was similarly excited as her husband had exactly the same experience.

Approximately half of the highways in Germany have no speed limits. Back in America, a recent study indicates that the average vehicle driver will react to other drivers with profanity slightly more than 32,000 times during a lifetime of negotiating streets and highways.

You may have never heard of a Frenchman named Charles Perrault who lived in the 1600’s. However, you have very likely heard of the “Mother Goose” stories that he collected and published. His stories included Little Red Riding Hood, Cinderella and Sleeping Beauty.

Scientists, environmentalists, and fishermen are distressed by the effects of an invasive species. The creature is slow, blind and brainless. However, the comb jellyfish can eat ten times its body weight every 24 hours. Its behavior can obliterate key links in a saltwater food chain. The once thriving anchovy industry in the Black Sea was ruined by this jellyfish. The uninvited blobs have been discovered on the east coasts of both North and South America as well the cod-rich portions of the Baltic Sea. An international group of scientists is now focused on combating the infiltration of this destructive jellyfish (Mnemiopsis). Well, try to be prudent with your bird calls – and have a “real hoot” this week.
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