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Going red for heart health
by Christina Rowland
Feb 02, 2013 | 1232 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Christina Rowland photo
Members of the Christus Spohn Hospital staff linked arms on Thursday morning to show their support for Go Red For Women, a national campaign by the American Heart Association to raise awareness of women’s heart disease. The red shows support for the cause. More than 30 hospital associates wore red in support.
Christina Rowland photo Members of the Christus Spohn Hospital staff linked arms on Thursday morning to show their support for Go Red For Women, a national campaign by the American Heart Association to raise awareness of women’s heart disease. The red shows support for the cause. More than 30 hospital associates wore red in support.
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BEEVILLE — Walking through the halls of Christus Spohn Hospital on Thursday morning, it appeared that the staff had changed uniforms from the familiar navy blue scrubs to red.

Come to find out, the hospital was just banding together to show support for heart disease prevention.

Feb. 1 actually is considered national Wear Red Day by the American Red Cross and is part of campaign called Go Red For Women that raises awareness of cardiovascular disease in females.

“One in three women over the age of 20 has some sort of cardiovascular disease,” according to a fact sheet handed out by the staff.

Mari Grace Cuellar, chief nursing officer for the Beeville hospital, said the disease can start building up in women at a young age but not cause problems such as a stroke or heart attack until later in life.

There are some things that can be done to help prevent and control heart disease such as manage your weight, have wellness checkups (physicals) with a doctor annually, exercise daily and a healthy diet.

“Those are the biggest things you can do,” Cuellar said. “If you smoke, you should try to stop too.”

The fact sheet also said that “worldwide, cardiovascular disease is the single most common cause of death among women, regardless of race and ethnicity.”

Though the staff only wears the red that one day, Cuellar said it draws extra attention to them. People ask about the red shirts, and it gives them a chance to talk to people about cardiovascular disease.

The staff also holds health fairs and programs throughout the year, raising awareness of different health programs, but participating in Wear Red Day gives them one more opportunity to spread their message.

The Beeville hospital has partaken in the Go Red effort for five years, and every year the participation seems to get bigger, the staff said.

Christina Rowland is the regional editor at the Bee-Picayune and can be reached at 358-2550, ext. 119, or at regional@mySouTex.com.
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