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OwlLady69
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July 03, 2015
Thank you for your years of service, Dr. Williams. Enjoy your retirement (when it gets here). "Welcome" to your colleague, Dr. Daniels! Dr. Williams, I appreciate the care you and your staff always gave my birds. Yes, that was a few years ago, but I still remember, and I am grateful. You even let me bring one in on a Saturday, for boarding, when we needed to leave town suddenly. I'll never forget that. May God bless you, always.
High school BPA student ranks high at nationals
Jul 03, 2015 | 40 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
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Alyssa Vela placed third in the state extemporaneous speech competition and earned a 10th place medal at nationals in Anaheim, California.
Contributed photo Alyssa Vela placed third in the state extemporaneous speech competition and earned a 10th place medal at nationals in Anaheim, California.
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Mathis High School junior Alyssa Vela was one of 20 students who competed in the Business Professionals of America (BPA) national competitions held in Anaheim, California in May. Alyssa, who placed third in the state extemporaneous speech competition, earned a 10th place medal at nationals. Alyssa spoke on the topic of “Should the U.S. cut the penny coin from American currency.” Contestants each had 10 minutes to prepare a three to four minute speech and could use only one index card for notes while speaking. Alyssa also competed on the web design team which was one place away from appearing in the finals. Also, 2015 Mathis graduate Guillermo Vela competed in computer security in his fourth appearance at the national competitions and earned two Microsoft security certifications. Guillermo commented that each year the testing in the security category has been more rigorous than the previous year.
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Johnson named as ADHA district delegate
by By Monica Cruz Coastal Bend College
Jul 03, 2015 | 109 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Johnson
Johnson
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BEEVILLE – Brittany Johnson, a second-year dental hygiene student from Laredo, was selected to represent the Coastal Bend College Dental Hygiene Program as one of the 2015-2016 student delegates for the American Dental Hygiene Association. There are 12 recognized districts, with a total of 12 student delegates representing the organization within the United States. As a District IX representative, she represented dental hygiene students from Texas, New Mexico and Oklahoma. She is the daughter of Tracy Ralph and Sussy Johnson. It was her passion for the health field that led her to pursue an education in the dental field. As a high school student, she was able to get a head start on her educational goals through dual enrollment at Laredo Community College. Not only did she tackle both her high school studies and higher education studies simultaneously, but she was also able to attain a four-year scholarship to Texas A&M International University. She graduated from Texas A&M International University with a bachelor of science degree in biology in May 2012 and set out to pursue her goal of becoming a dental hygienist. “I consider myself fortunate to have been able to gain a deeper appreciation and understanding for this field of work because of my aunt, who currently handles her own practice in Mexico. She took me under her wing, and I was able to gain thorough insight and guidance by shadowing her work. I was also able to attain hands-on experience from my employment as an orthodontic assistant at a local practice in Laredo throughout my undergraduate studies,” Johnson said. After obtaining her bachelor’s degree, she decided it was time to gain some hands-on experience in her field of studies. She opted to enter the workforce as an orthodontic assistant for a local practice. During her four years as an assistant, she had the privilege of working with some of the most talented orthodontists. She decided to take the next step and applied and was accepted into CBC’s Dental Hygiene Program. The campus provides her with close proximity to her family and she found the small-town atmosphere to be quite enjoyable. Johnson’s decision to pursue a dental hygiene career is a smart one—the U.S. Department of Labor predicts a 33 percent increase in the dental hygienist field through the year 2022. For Johnson, this means there won’t be a shortage of jobs for her to choose from when she graduates in 2016. The U.S. Department of Labor data also suggest that dental hygiene graduates could expect to make about $57,920 in the Coastal Bend region straight out of college. “I don’t believe in coincidence. There is a reason why I am at CBC,” Johnson said. At the beginning of this year’s spring semester Johnson, along with some of her peers, attended a joint conference for the Texas Dental Hygienists’ Association Student Annual Session and the Texas Dental Hygiene Educators Association Annual Session in San Marcos. CBC dental hygiene students were given the opportunity to participate in a variety of activities, which included a mock voting session for Texas student delegates to the Texas Dental Hygienists’ Association. During the mock voting session, various groups of students were presented with information and/or issues that were currently happening in the dental hygiene field. Once they had time to review the information that was presented to them, students had to make a decision from the information. Although it was a mock voting session, students were made aware that their votes would represent all the dental hygiene students in the state. Once all of the sessions were completed, first-year students were encouraged to complete an application to be an ADHA student delegate for the 2015-16 academic year. Johnson managed to complete and submit her application within one week, all while studying for course exams and completing clinical hours. Two weeks later she received a phone call from the ADHA and was selected as a delegate. “When I applied to be an ADHA District IX student delegate, I stepped out of my comfort zone. I am usually shy and a bit conservative, but over the years I’ve learned to open up and expose myself to new experiences and opportunities.” Johnson, along with the 11 other student delegates from the organization, participated in the 2015 Center for Lifelong Learning at the 92nd ADHA Annual Session in Nashville, Tennessee, from June 17-23. Student delegates had the opportunity to network and interact with the other delegates while learning different facets of the dental hygiene profession. The school year is going to be an eventful and memorable one for Johnson. Not only is she going to be an ADHA student delegate, she also has been elected to serve as president of the CBC student chapter of the American Dental Hygienists’ Association. “I am grateful for this opportunity, and it proves that hard work definitely pays off. I am one step closer to fulfilling my dream of working in the field of dentistry,” she said.
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What I learned from Beeville
Jul 03, 2015 | 53 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Editor: As a school boy in India, I had the impression that America is a concrete jungle. I had this from the pictures that appeared in the journals from USA. I came to this country in 2001, and worked in Los Angeles and New York. The skyscrapers of these cities justified my false impression. In December 2014, I started working in Beeville, Texas, and I began to realize that this nation has a different face, too. I felt life is very slow-paced here. People are very friendly. There is no heavy traffic on the road, and there is simplicity everywhere. I am more at home with the place and people, and easily getting along with the society and the lifestyle. One day I went to a barbershop in the town. The shopkeeper greeted me and introduced himself as Kenneth Chesshir. While working on my hair he started talking. He appeared very dignified, and he highly impressed me. When I was about to pay him, he said, “I give my priests free haircuts,” and he added, “if you are very particular please drop it in the donation box.” I learned from him that he served the city as mayor for 13 years, and has been in the haircut business ever since he took it over from his parents in 1977. He was very proud to tell me that his family was involved in this business for the last 100 years. On my way back home, I was wondering: A mayor working as a barber! Could this happen in India? Americans believe any profession has its own dignity, and none is judged on the type of work he or she does, but on how the work is done. This is the key to progress. This is in sharp contrast with the mentality of Indians. Though banned, India is still under the grip of the social evil of a caste system. Broadly speaking, a caste system is a process of placing people in occupational groups. Rooted in religion and based on a division of labor, the caste system dictates the type of occupations a person can pursue and the social interactions that she or he may have. The most tragic reality is that most of the manual work is set apart for the low caste. They don’t have the social recognition, and they are considered inferiors. If ever anyone wants to climb up the hierarchical ladder, his or her mobility is strictly prohibited. In modern India, it is now a crime to practice the caste system thanks to the leadership of Mahatma Gandhi. Still, this practice has pervaded the whole labyrinth of Indian society and its economy. The profession of a barber was exclusively set apart for the lowest caste, and they were looked down upon too. Hence, an Indian is wondering at a mayor in the USA who is working as a barber. My wish is that Indians stop attaching social stigma to manual work and workers. Rev. Paul Kottackal
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Mayor fields idea of moving airport to Chase
by Gary Kent
Jul 03, 2015 | 291 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Frank McIllwain and Perry Havenar
Frank McIllwain and Perry Havenar
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BEEVILLE – Mayor David Carabajal said Monday evening that he wants to form a committee to look at the “pros and cons” of moving Beeville’s municipal airport operation to the Chase Field Industrial and Airport Complex. Carabajal said that after City Council and Bee Development Authority board members heard a presentation from Perry Havenar and Frank McIllwain of Garver, Inc. The two consultants are based in Frisco. McIllwain is an engineer, vice president and Texas aviation director for the company. Havenar is the senior aviation planner and aviation planning resource leader. The consultants handed out a 53-page report on their findings and recommendations as the meeting got underway at the Beeville Event Center. Three local pilots, representing Beeville Air Services, LLC, were also at the meeting. That company, comprised of Larry Cline, Gary Jones and Tim Fitch, serves as the fixed base operator at the city’s airport. The consultants said that if the city moves the operation to Chase Field, it would be required to repay some of the grant funds it has received from the Federal Aviation Administration and Texas Department of Transportation since 1998. Although the city has received almost $1.5 million from the federal and state agencies, the amount that would need to be repaid would be prorated and would come to $312,225. Havenar said the city bought the 160-acre property from the estate of Jennie Berry Elder in 1964 at a price of $10. The seller retained mineral rights and has the first option to purchase the property back in the event that the city should discontinue the use of the facility. The city also has acquired an additional 11 acres of property there, bringing the total acreage to 171. The city has built a terminal facility at the airport and hangars for 14 aircraft that are kept there. Two businesses also are located on the property. Havenar said if the city chooses to sell the property, the process would have to be coordinated with TxDOT to ensure the process is completed appropriately and a financial plan is outlined for use and disbursement. All aviation facilities would have to be removed from the property and it would not be allowed to operate as an airport or aviation facility after the city no longer owns the property. All properties owned by private individuals or businesses would have to be removed from the site before it is sold. Buildings and structures would have to be removed or demolished The consultants explained that the runway, taxiway, parking apron space and hangar facilities at Chase Field are much better than what is available at the municipal airport. However, the municipal airport is the only one of the two facilities now included in the FAA’s National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems (NPIAS). That makes the municipal airport the only one of the two facilities in the county eligible for grant funds from the FAA and TxDOT. The BDA has wanted that NPIAS designation for years and it would have that if the municipal airport operation moves to the former naval air station. Carabajal said the 53-page report provides a lot of information to digest and that was why he recommended that a committee be formed to study the idea and make a recommendation to the City Council. He said he wants BDA members and someone from Beeville Air Services to be on that committee. The mayor also wants to serve on that committee. Only three members of the BDA board, President Laura Fischer, Beatrice Espinoza and Rev. Eric Tarver, were at the meeting Monday. Three council members also were there, including Carabajal, Yvonne Dunn and Bebe Adamez. BDA Executive Director Joe B. Montez suggested that his board would appoint members to the committee in a few days when it holds its next regular meeting. Carabajal said he expects the City Council to appoint representatives to the committee at its next meeting on July 14 or at a special meeting. The three representatives of Beeville Air Services did not comment during the meeting but some suggested as the meeting ended that the city probably would not be able to afford the change. Gary Kent is a reporter at the Bee-Picayune and can be reached at 358-2550, ext. 120, or at reporter@mySouTex.com.
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