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Slide finish at Kids College
Jul 05, 2015 | 5 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Karyssa Abrigo holds her nose as she slides down the inflatable slide and into the water last Friday. This was the last day of Kids College at Coastal Bend College and the youngsters had a reason to celebrate. Kids College is a chance for students to learn from professional staff. They are exposed to careers in all five of the high school endorsement programs: STEM, Business and Industry, Fine Arts, Public Service, Multidisciplinary.
Karyssa Abrigo holds her nose as she slides down the inflatable slide and into the water last Friday. This was the last day of Kids College at Coastal Bend College and the youngsters had a reason to celebrate. Kids College is a chance for students to learn from professional staff. They are exposed to careers in all five of the high school endorsement programs: STEM, Business and Industry, Fine Arts, Public Service, Multidisciplinary.
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A fraction of a second later Shelby Slavinski hit the water at the end of this inflatable water slide.
A fraction of a second later Shelby Slavinski hit the water at the end of this inflatable water slide.
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Mickayla Banda looks to be enjoying herself as she slides down an inflatable water slide in the Coastal Bend College parking lot last Friday. This was the last day of Kids College and what better way to celebrate the end of lessons that playing in the water.
Mickayla Banda looks to be enjoying herself as she slides down an inflatable water slide in the Coastal Bend College parking lot last Friday. This was the last day of Kids College and what better way to celebrate the end of lessons that playing in the water.
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Friday, June 26 was the last day of Kids College at Coastal Bend College and the youngsters had a reason to celebrate. Kids College is a chance for students to learn from professional staff. They are exposed to careers in all five of the high school endorsement programs: STEM, Business and Industry, Fine Arts, Public Service, Multidisciplinary.
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Sent to do mission work
by By Gary Conklin Pastor, Faith Lutheran Church
Jul 05, 2015 | 39 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Today, I would like for us to take a look at what I call a sending out story. This story is from the Gospel of Mark, found in Mark 6:1-13. Here, we find Jesus back home from a successful road trip. His disciples have followed Him and seen Him minister in many ways and preach about the kingdom of God. All has been successful while away from his home territory. At this point the disciples are probably thinking, “This mission stuff is a piece of cake!” Then in order to finish the training, Jesus brings them back home to a place where everyone knows him. Did this turn out to be successful also? Well, of course not! The people in His hometown reject Him and showed little faith, therefore we read that just a few were healed. So what is the lesson here—that we cannot do mission and outreach in our own towns? I think not. I think Jesus used this as a teaching experience for His disciples and for us. I think He is trying to show here, that spreading the word of God’s kingdom will not always be easy or meet with success. In fact, sometimes we will be downright rejected. So, what happens next? Jesus sends out His disciples and gives them instructions. Jesus does great deeds and of power and gives His disciples authority over evil, sickness and healing. Yet, none of this power just happens; it is received by faith. The faith comes in when Jesus tells the disciples to go out without money or supplies so they will be dependent on how others receive them. Do you have that kind of faith? Think about it; when we are sent out from our church services or assemblies on Sunday morning, we are sent to witness and to heal; we are asked to be vulnerable, to be dependent on the reception of others. This can be a very scary thing! But Jesus does not send us out alone; He sends the Holy Spirit with us. You see, the Spirit is always there between us all; between Jesus and God the Father, between Jesus and us, between you and me, and between us and those to whom we are sent (Sunday and Seasons Preaching 2015 – July 5, 2015). No matter how hard our mission work may be, it is only our job to plant the seed. The Holy Spirit will be with us to cultivate the crop. We must step out in faith. So with Jesus’ instructions from Mark 6:1-13, brothers and sisters, go out this week and spread the healing news of Jesus Christ with great faith!
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it’s a bird, it’s a plane, it’s a book
Jul 05, 2015 | 9 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print

Paul Gonzales photo
Read-a-Book-Man (rumored to be local youngster’s favorite entertainer Mr. Kippy) showed up to the Mathis Public Library to finish off the kids’ monthlong superhero reading program. The children were encouraged to dress up as their favorite superhero and were treated to a pizza party afterward.
Paul Gonzales photo Read-a-Book-Man (rumored to be local youngster’s favorite entertainer Mr. Kippy) showed up to the Mathis Public Library to finish off the kids’ monthlong superhero reading program. The children were encouraged to dress up as their favorite superhero and were treated to a pizza party afterward.
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Wednesday afternoon crunch
Jul 04, 2015 | 542 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Wednesday afternoon crunch.Gary Kent photo."It's a month old," said the owner of this GMC pickup truck Wednesday afternoon. His new truck had just been sideswiped and pushed over a couple of feet by a large trailer being pulled by a semi tractor when the big rig made a right hand turn from U.S. Highway 59 onto Washington Street at the northwest corner of the Prosperity Bank property. One officer at the scene suggested that the driver of the 18-wheeler probably missed seeing the truck route sign on the west side of the city that steers big rigs away from the downtown area.
Wednesday afternoon crunch.Gary Kent photo."It's a month old," said the owner of this GMC pickup truck Wednesday afternoon. His new truck had just been sideswiped and pushed over a couple of feet by a large trailer being pulled by a semi tractor when the big rig made a right hand turn from U.S. Highway 59 onto Washington Street at the northwest corner of the Prosperity Bank property. One officer at the scene suggested that the driver of the 18-wheeler probably missed seeing the truck route sign on the west side of the city that steers big rigs away from the downtown area.
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“It’s a month old,” said the owner of this GMC pickup truck Wednesday afternoon. His new truck had just been sideswiped and pushed over a couple of feet by a large trailer being pulled by a semi-tractor when the big rig made a right-hand turn from U.S. Highway 59 onto Washington Street at the corner of the Prosperity Bank property. One officer at the scene suggested that the driver of the 18-wheeler probably missed seeing the truck route sign on the west side of the city that steers big rigs away from the downtown area.
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Giving’s generous during Cattleman’s Roundup fundraiser for Driscoll Children’s Hospital
by Jason Collins
Jul 04, 2015 | 284 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
This was no ordinary auction. Everyone seemed to have a good time as they bid on various 4-H foods and crafts to benefit the Driscoll Children’s Hospital.
This was no ordinary auction. Everyone seemed to have a good time as they bid on various 4-H foods and crafts to benefit the Driscoll Children’s Hospital.
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Bethan Keener, with Bee Kountry 4-H, holds a welcome wreath during the South Texas Cattlemen’s Roundup benefiting Driscoll Children’s Hospital.
Bethan Keener, with Bee Kountry 4-H, holds a welcome wreath during the South Texas Cattlemen’s Roundup benefiting Driscoll Children’s Hospital.
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Youngsters wait their turn to take items out for auction in the South Texas Cattlemen’s Roundup benefiting Driscoll Children’s Hospital.
Youngsters wait their turn to take items out for auction in the South Texas Cattlemen’s Roundup benefiting Driscoll Children’s Hospital.
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BEEVILLE – The total isn’t known yet, but the amount raised Friday for Driscoll Children’s Hospital exceeded that of last year. “Things went really well,” said Lynne Sixta, who coordinated the South Texas Cattlemen’s Roundup for Driscoll. “Last year they raised $27,000.” The auction was held last Friday at the Beeville Livestock Commission. The dozens of items auctioned were carried in by area 4-H members. “We have seven of these roundups throughout the summer,” Sixta said. “Collectively, we are hoping to raise enough money to purchase a new ambulance for the hospital.” “Any time a child needs to be transported, they will come either by ambulance or if they are in a dire emergency, they will come by helicopter,” she said. Sponsored by Lyssy & Eckel Feeds, the South Texas Cattlemen’s Roundup is a grass-roots fundraiser held every summer in cities throughout Driscoll’s 31-county service area. Local 4-H clubs, Future Farmers of America chapters, county extension agents and businesses participate by donating goods and services that are auctioned off to benefit the hospital. Those items include: homemade baked goods, agricultural and ranching products, arts and crafts and other items. Sixta, who was in the audience Friday, said that she is always impressed with the outpouring of support from the community. “We are so pleased the community is willing to support Driscoll,” she said. “A cake went for $300.” Peanut brittle sold for well over $500. “Tickets to the San Antonio Rodeo went for $3,000,” she said. “We cannot even begin to thank everyone enough for their generosity,” Sixta said This year’s Cattlemen’s Roundups are being held in memory of Hoyte Gentry, who – with the help of his friend Ralph R. Meuth – initiated the events in 1987 with millions being raised for the children of South Texas. Sixta said, “It is good for the kids to be able to do something that helps another child.” Jason Collins is the editor at the Bee-Picayune and can be reached at 343-5221, or at editor@mySouTex.com.
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