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doucare
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March 29, 2015
Why cant you all just leave people alone.. gez we are taxed to death and ruled to death We cant do any thing without paying and arm and a leg for it. You make it impossible to own a home with over the top property taxes! You harass people and want more taxes from them for simply owning a 5th wheel and keeping it on their own property! Even though its next to their home empty! Leave us alone already! You want to do something constructive? Work on making our drinking water safe. Get with the broken water department ban together make this place livable!
Beeville makes a comic book cameo
by Paul Gonzales
Mar 29, 2015 | 233 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Deputy Garcia, seen with the eye patch leaning on the truck, made her comic book debut in the original Grindhouse series and returns in “Grindhouse: Drive In, Bleed Out #3.” When asked where she’s from in Texas, Garcia simply responds, “Beeville. In Bee County.” Even though Beeville has been mentioned before in Hollywood films, this may be the first time our city has appeared in a comic book.
Deputy Garcia, seen with the eye patch leaning on the truck, made her comic book debut in the original Grindhouse series and returns in “Grindhouse: Drive In, Bleed Out #3.” When asked where she’s from in Texas, Garcia simply responds, “Beeville. In Bee County.” Even though Beeville has been mentioned before in Hollywood films, this may be the first time our city has appeared in a comic book.
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BEEVILLE – Dark Horse Comics, most notably publishers of Hellboy, Conan and Buffy the Vampire Slayer comic books, started a new series this past December titled Grindhouse: Drive In, Bleed Out. The series features over-the-top gore and violence just like the low budget ’70s feature films from where it gets its title. Each issue contains one part of a new story with its conclusion following the month after. For issue three of the series, writer Alex de Campi decided to call upon a popular character that was featured in the first series, Grindhouse: Doors Open at Midnight: motorcycle-riding, shotgun-wielding, femme fatale Deputy Garcia. In the first mini-series, Garcia defeated the Bee Vixens from Mars, and upon her comic book return readers learn exactly where she’s from: “Beeville. In Bee County.” No wonder she didn’t have any problems taking out the Bee Vixens. Readers won’t find out if she wins this time or if the Bee Vixens return, but if they pick up next month’s issue, certainly all will be revealed. Those interested can check out previews of Grindhouse: Drive In, Bleed Out at darkhorse.com.
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Trojans drop fourth straight following 7-6 loss to Kingsville
Mar 29, 2015 | 147 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Trojans pitcher Bryan Reyna allowed nine hits and seven runs in the loss to Kingsville.
Trojans pitcher Bryan Reyna allowed nine hits and seven runs in the loss to Kingsville.
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KINGSVILLE – The A.C. Jones Trojans and Kingsville Brahmas went neck and neck, but a late Kingsville single proved to be the difference, as the Brahmas prevailed over the Trojans 7-6 last Tuesday. Following a 2-2 tie after two innings, the Trojans started to pick it up in the third. An RBI double from Justin Gomez scored two, and a single from Garza brought the Trojan lead to 5-2. The Brahmas fired back at the bottom of the third, scoring four runs of their own, as a three-run double and a sacrifice fly put them up 6-5. With two outs at the top of the sixth, a Trojan double allowed A.J. Gomez to score, knotting the game up at 6 apiece. The Trojans then prevented the Brahmas from scoring at the bottom of the sixth, but they failed to retake the lead at the top of the seventh. In the bottom half, Brahma Anthony Munoz singled, allowing David Guerra to score the winning run. Justin Gomez led the way for the Trojans, putting up three RBIs on three hits. Pitcher Bryan Reyna took the loss for the Trojans, allowing seven runs, while fanning three and walking out three. The loss was the Trojans fourth straight, leaving them with a 2-11 record overall and an 0-3 mark in District 31-4A.
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Bubble Day
Mar 29, 2015 | 73 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Jason Collins photoEmery Johnson, 8, and Darius Johnson, 7, were in Beeville last week enjoying spring break. These two Corpus Christi youngsters were down to visit their grandmother, Vera Johnson who decided to take them to Bubble day at the Joe Barnhart Bee County Library. Making bubbles like this isn...t as easy as it seems. Hopes can be popped with one wrong move of the wand.
Jason Collins photoEmery Johnson, 8, and Darius Johnson, 7, were in Beeville last week enjoying spring break. These two Corpus Christi youngsters were down to visit their grandmother, Vera Johnson who decided to take them to Bubble day at the Joe Barnhart Bee County Library. Making bubbles like this isn...t as easy as it seems. Hopes can be popped with one wrong move of the wand.
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Emery Johnson, 8, and Darius Johnson, 7, were in Beeville last week enjoying spring break. These two Corpus Christi youngsters were down to visit their grandmother, Vera Johnson, who decided to take them to bubble day at the Joe Barnhart Bee County Library. Making bubbles like this isn’t as easy as it seems. Hopes can be popped with one wrong move of the wand.
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Zoning law changes could limit some buildings
by Gary Kent
Mar 29, 2015 | 358 views | 1 1 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Hamlett
Hamlett
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BEEVILLE – Those funny-looking buildings that keep popping up in places where they probably should not be in the city may be a lot harder to bring in if Beeville’s Planning and Zoning Commission has its way. That was the topic of conversation when commissioners Louis Longoria Jr., John Salinas, Jody Alaniz, Erie Head and Shelia Poorman met at City Hall Monday evening. City Manager Jack Hamlett introduced a former associate, retired Seguin zoning director Don Smith. Smith said he had dealt with the problem of non-conforming and mobile homes inside Seguin for years before he retired. Smith said it is easier to keep such structures out of the city than it is to get rid of them once they have been moved into town. Currently, if someone wants to move a non-confirming or manufactured home into the city, there is little to prevent that from happening. A change to the existing zoning ordinance, No. 1114-B, could allow non-conforming buildings into the city but keep those structures out until they had undergone some renovations. Smith showed commissioners a photo of an example of a non-conforming building. It was a boxed structure with no windows and no porch. Smith recommended amending the ordinance to require that anyone wanting to move a building into the city present detailed plans for making improvements to the structure. He said it also would be important to make sure that at least 80 percent of the improvements, like foundations, wiring and steps to the porch, be completed before the city issues a permit to allow the building to be moved into town. Hamlett said the ordinance could give the property owner a set period of time, probably six months, to complete the improvements, or the owner could be taken to municipal court. The punishment for disobeying the ordinance would be up to the municipal judge. He suggested that the judge could impose a fine on the violator, possibly on a daily basis until the improvements are made. Hamlett also recommended that the city establish a building standards commission to assure compliance. The city manager said an amendment to the existing ordinance would give the city staff a way to prohibit double-wide mobile homes or manufactured homes and non-conforming structures from being moved into the city. As for mobile or manufactured homes, those structures already can only be moved into the city if they are to be located in one of a few places in town zoned for such structures. Hamlett and Jones pointed out that the city staff plays an important role in keeping non-conforming structures out of the city. When the buildings are set up on property in town, the owners must have water, sewer and electric connections made to the structure. That gives the building inspector and code compliance officer an opportunity to take action. In most cases, the owner can be made to remove the structure from the city because bringing it into town would be a violation of an ordinance. Commissioner Longoria made a motion to work up an amended ordinance and send it to the City Council for final approval. The motion was seconded by Head, and it passed unanimously. Before adjourning, Smith told the commissioners that they need to consider changing their zoning laws to correct a flaw in the existing regulations. He said the existing document allows a “pyramid effect” whereby structures zoned for more restrictive parts of town are allowed to be located in zones that are not as restricted. For instance, a business cannot be located in a residential zone, but a residence can be located in a business zone. “In the 1920s and ’30s, when zoning laws were first being passed, that was popular,” Smith said. But that creates problems, most often with parking. “Most commercial businesses don’t want residences right up next to them,” Smith said. He recommended amending current ordinances to “create a clear dividing line between districts.” Smith said it is often common to find professional businesses, like architects, attorneys and others, working out of their homes. Also, Hamlett pointed out that neighborhood day care centers are allowed to locate in residential areas if they keep fewer than six children. “So you think right now Beeville’s in the ’20s and ’30s?” Alaniz asked Smith. “Right now you are,” Smith answered. And he reminded the commissioners that it may take a while to bring the city up to date because so many non-complying structures are grandfathered. However, he assured the commission that once a property changes hands, the city can force the new owner to comply with the zoning laws. “Beeville’s not a tiny, little town,” Smith said. “I mean you’ve got what, 14,000 people?” Gary Kent is a reporter at the Bee-Picayune and can be reached at 358-2550, ext. 120, or at reporter@mySouTex.com.
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doucare
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7 Hours Ago
Why cant you all just leave people alone.. gez we are taxed to death and ruled to death We cant do any thing without paying and arm and a leg for it. You make it impossible to own a home with over the top property taxes! You harass people and want more taxes from them for simply owning a 5th wheel and keeping it on their own property! Even though its next to their home empty! Leave us alone already! You want to do something constructive? Work on making our drinking water safe. Get with the broken water department ban together make this place livable!