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No place like home: Prayers answered with new, energy-efficient house
by William J. Gibbs Jr.
Aug 28, 2016 | 815 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Maria Resio (left) receives the key to her newly built home on Cockade Street in Tynan from Bee County Judge Stephanie Silvas Aug. 11. The judge was among the first to visit Resio and her husband, Manuel, when it was turned over to them that morning after it was built through the county's participation in the HOME Program.
Maria Resio (left) receives the key to her newly built home on Cockade Street in Tynan from Bee County Judge Stephanie Silvas Aug. 11. The judge was among the first to visit Resio and her husband, Manuel, when it was turned over to them that morning after it was built through the county's participation in the HOME Program.
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TYNAN – Two Cockade Street residents are the proud residents of one of four new Bee County homes recently built through the HOME Program. Manuel and Maria Resio received the keys to their house Aug. 11 from Bee County Judge Stephanie Silvas, who was among the first visitors to the couple’s three-bedroom, two-bathroom home. The Resios’ eldest daughter, Yolanda Landis, was among the family members on hand to wish her parents well in their new abode. She spoke of the poor quality water that came from the former home’s well, and how the couple had to purchase potable water to drink. “So we never had a washer/dryer,” she said. “We used to go to Orange Grove to the laundromat. But they don’t drive anymore.” Not only does the Resios’ new home have modern, energy-efficient appliances including a washing machine and dryer, it also has something the couple never has had in their 62 years of marriage — central air-conditioning. Donna M. Johnson, director of housing programs for GrantWorks Inc. — the county’s grant writing consultants — said the house built by Conroe-based RM Quality Construction includes double-pane windows and fiber-cement siding so that its occupants will keep their utility bills low. Furthermore, it is one story with 36-inch wide hallways and doorways, which are helpful to 77-year-old Maria, who recently underwent knee surgery and uses a walker. “It’s designed so [Manuel and Maria] can stay in the home longer,” Johnson said. The Resios were allowed to select the colors for the cabinet finishes, laminate flooring and interior and exterior paint. However, 80-year-old Manuel proudly stated that he left those details to his wife. Silvas, who was impressed with the finished home when she was treated to a tour, believes the newest house on the block could prompt other residents to spruce up their properties. “Any time you have improvement in a community, it’s contagious,” she said. For Maria, the house is the product of nine years of determination, hope and prayers. Knowing that she and her husband were unable to rehabilitate their home, Maria applied for income-based assistance through the HOME Program, but repeatedly was turned down. Johnson said this was because, initially, the program only allowed for $25,000 worth of renovations, but the Resios’ home needed far more work. But recent changes in the program — about which Maria said she learned by reading the Bee-Picayune — have allowed grant recipients to receive $85,000 worth of demolition and rebuilding services. Johnson said the only catch is that the owners must have a clear title and are required to reside in the home for five years after the work is completed. As she smiled while fighting back tears, Maria gleefully said, “I used to pray, ‘Lord, am I not going to get a house? Am I not going to get to remodel my home before I die?’ And He did it!” Shortly after getting selected for the program, Maria was hospitalized for her surgery. She recalls filling out some of the necessary paperwork from her hospital bed. Upon coming home, she and Manuel had to reside elsewhere while the months long construction commenced. Family friend Mando Cavazos offered the use of his deceased parents’ former home, which is nearby. “And he didn’t charge them rent,” Landis said. “The neighbors helped move them out of their old house and into the other house. It was a community effort, too.” The Resios’ house is one of four Bee County residences recently completed thanks to the HOME Program. Other residents also receiving the keys to their houses Aug. 11 were: •Julia Ramos, who resides in the Blueberry Hill community west of Beeville •Angelica Garza, who resides on County Road 406 east of Beeville •Louis Herrera, who resides in the city limits of Beeville. Johnson added that there are other homes being built because of the program in various areas of Bee County. The HOME Program is funded through the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.
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Reunion of MHS Classes 1966 to 1976 scheduled for Sept. 8-10
Aug 28, 2016 | 15 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Mathis High School classes of 1966 thru 1976 will hold a reunion on Sept. 8, 9 and 10. Darla Dobie Norwood of Katy, Class of 1971, is organizing a weekend reunion that includes a Mathis High School tour on Thursday, Sept. 8, at 5 p.m. followed by the Mathis Homecoming Pep Rally at Pirate Stadium. On Sept. 9, the group will attend the Homecoming Pirate game at Pirate Stadium. On Sept. 10 the group will meet at Tynan Recreation Hall at 6 p.m. and will hold a dance at 8 p.m. Detailed information is available at mathisgrads.myevent.com, or contact Darla Norwood at scuba143@yahoo.com.
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Knights of Columbus honors
Aug 28, 2016 | 198 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Left – John Zarbock (at left),deputy grand knight of the Goliad chapter of the Knights of Columbus, accepts the plaque for the council project he headed. More than a thousand pounds of canned goods were collected during Easter for the Goliad Outreach. Jeremy Martin, district deputy, made the presentation. Right – Grand Knight Dwayne Machicek (on right) presented the retired Grand Knight plaque to Christian Rickman during a recent meeting of Goliad Council 7512 of the Knights of Columbus.
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CBC hosts Nurse Pinning, Candle Lighting Ceremony for LVN grads
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Aug 28, 2016 | 768 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Micaela “Mickie” Ochoa of Beeville was one of 95 graduates who were honored at Coastal Bend College’s Licensed Vocational Nursing (LVN) program’s pinning and candlelighting ceremony.
Micaela “Mickie” Ochoa of Beeville was one of 95 graduates who were honored at Coastal Bend College’s Licensed Vocational Nursing (LVN) program’s pinning and candlelighting ceremony.
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BEEVILLE – Coastal Bend College’s Licensed Vocational Nursing (LVN) program hosted its annual pinning and candle lighting ceremony on Thursday, Aug. 18, at the CBC Beeville campus. CBC’s ceremony honored LVN graduates from the Beeville, Alice, Kingsville and Pleasanton locations. The pinning ceremony is an annual event that signifies a student’s successful completion of their nursing education and commemorates their entrance into the nursing profession. Nursing schools across the United States have kept the pinning ceremony tradition alive to honor Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing. Nightingale started a similar tradition more than 150 years ago when she would present graduates from the nursing school she founded with a medal or a pin. CBC’s nursing instructors provided each student with a pin that will be worn throughout his or her nursing career. In addition, CBC’s LVN graduates recited the Florence Nightingale Nursing Pledge while holding a lamp, and each graduates’ candle was lighted by one of their instructors. The lighting of the lamp signifies each graduates intention of carrying Nightingale’s dedication and compassion for the nursing profession forward. This year’s keynote speaker was HALO-Flight’s Chief Medical Officer Randy Endsley. He is a resident of Corpus Christi who began his career in the medical field by serving in the United States Air Force. The majority of Endsley’s nursing career was spent in emergency rooms and intensive care units. In 1999, he joined HALO-Flight and was promoted to chief medical officer in 2002. The following students were honored at CBC’s LVN pinning and candle lighting ceremony: Adriana Maria Arredondo, Rossana Marie Brown, Melinda Catete, Shante Colon, Celeste Anik Contreras, Michelle Fuentes, Amy Nicole Garza, Monica Renee Gomez, Jessica V. Gonzales, Lizette Gonzalez, Heather Gracia, Richard Anthony Guerrero, Sean J. Harris, Bernice Vera Maloy, Oscar Martinez Jr., Ginger Cope Mayfield, Christian Matthew Morón, Micaela “Mickie” Ochoa, Desiree Lyn Rivas, Tarah Leibl Soliz, Amanda Nicole Sorensen, Madison Stone and Pedro Torres. For more information about CBC’s LVN program, contact CBC’s Nursing Department at 361-354-2768 or via email at mkrishan@coastalbend.edu. Information is also available online at www.coastalbend.edu/nursing.
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Adopt-A-Beach fall cleanup volunteer sign-up now open
Aug 28, 2016 | 22 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
AUSTIN – Volunteers can now sign up for the coastal cleanup that will be held on Saturday, September 24. The 2016 Texas General Land Office Adopt-A-Beach Fall Cleanup takes place at 30 sites coast-wide. Volunteers can sign up online at TexasAdoptABeach.org or show up on-site Saturday morning to take part in a fun-filled day at the beach that makes a difference. “Sign up now to join forces with thousands of other Texans who care about the coast,” said Texas Land Commissioner George P. Bush. “Marine debris kills wildlife and hurts tourism, but it’s a problem we can fix together. Come out and be a part of the solution on Saturday, September 24th.” The Portland cleanup will be held at Sunset Lake Park, located at 201 Sunset Drive, adjacent to U.S. 181. Those interested can call Aneita Ortiz-Cedeno at 361-816-1766 or email aneita.cedeno@texasadoptabeach.org. Registration will begin at 8:30 a.m. and the cleanup will be held from 9 a.m. to noon. The Texas Adopt-A-Beach program began in the fall of 1986, when 2,800 volunteers picked up 124 tons of trash. Since then, more than 496,000 volunteers have removed more than 9,200 tons of trash from Texas beaches. Each volunteer will be given data cards, gloves, pencils and trash bags. All volunteers are advised to wear closed-toe shoes, bring sunscreen and plenty of drinking water. The Texas General Land Office Adopt-A-Beach cleanups are held rain or shine. Texans who are not able to attend the cleanup can help keep their beaches clean by making a tax-deductible donation online at TexasAdoptABeach.org. There are several different Adopt-A-Beach sponsorship levels ranging from $25 to $25,000, allowing both individuals and corporations to contribute to this major cleanup effort. The 2016 Texas General Land Office Adopt-A-Beach Fall Cleanup is sponsored by SeaWorld and Busch Gardens Conservation Fund, Schlumberger, Ocean Conservancy, Noble Drilling Services, Corona Del Mar Properties and Trusted Senior Specialists. Everyone who signs up online and checks in at their cleanup location will be entered to win one of seven RTIC Soft Pack 20 coolers. The random drawing will take place after the cleanup. Supporters can now also support the Texas coast all year by purchasing the official Texas General Land Office Adopt-A-Beach specialty license plate. For every plate sale, the Adopt-A-Beach program receives a direct benefit that will help the program continue to grow, reduce litter on Texas beaches, and provide environmental education to youths. Plates cost $30 in addition to regular vehicle fees, with $22 of that used to support the Texas coastline. Personalized plates are also available for an extra $40. The cost of purchasing the plate is considered a tax-deductible donation.
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