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Gravesite thefts continue
by Gary Kent
Apr 30, 2016 | 571 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
BEEVILLE – Copper thieves have struck again at one of Bee County’s cemeteries. A local man said he went to the grave sites of his parents at Beeville Memorial Park just north of U.S. Highway 59 and realized the bronze vases at the site were missing. “I looked up and down the whole row, and all of the vases were gone,” he said Thursday. Joel Castañeda of Oak Parks Funeral Chapel said the vase thefts are nothing new. There is a lot of copper in the alloy that is bronze, and the price of copper has created a lucrative business for thieves. Copper wire, copper tubing in air conditioning systems and other items made of copper have been targeted for some time. However, bronze flower vases made to go with certain grave markers have been targeted in Bee County only recently. Castañeda said any grave marker that is designed to hold vases will be delivered with the bronze vases. It is up to the family to replace the vases with ones that will not be targeted by thieves. The funeral director said most replacement vases are made of hard plastic, and they are designed to fit right into the receptacles built into the monuments. Eric Tarver, a funeral director for Treviño Funeral Home, agreed reluctantly. “People have their preferences,” Tarver said. The bronze vases are designed to be used with certain grave markers, and he hates the fact that some families might have to choose to diminish the quality of the materials at the markers. “If this persists, I recommend they go that route,” Tarver said. John Galloway of Galloway & Sons Funeral Home said he already offers the cheaper alternative vases for his clients. Families can purchase the less-expensive vases for about $98. The price for another bronze vase is almost $300. “I think it’s a very good alternative,” Galloway said. “It’s a problem that cemeteries are having across the country.” Catching the thieves apparently is not easy. One of the victims, a retired law enforcement officer, said it would require setting up numerous cameras in the cemeteries to capture images of the thieves. Even then, if the thieves know the cameras are there, they can approach the graves in such a way as to not be identifiable. Tarver agreed that using cameras to catch the thieves would be expensive and possibly not very effective. Families can find companies that sell the alternative vases on the Internet, or funeral directors would be glad to help them find a replacement vase that would not attract thieves. One company on the Internet claims that their hard plastic alternatives last almost an eternity.
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Salinas takes bronze
Apr 30, 2016 | 39 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Mathis Pirate Jose Salinas took home a third-place medal at the regional tennis tournament and is a state finals alternate. Pirate regional qualifiers who competed at the meet along with Salinas were Elena Robles, Monica del Bosque, Jose Salinas, Myah Medrano and Mark Zamora with coaches Rafael Delgado and Theresa Gonzalez.
Mathis Pirate Jose Salinas took home a third-place medal at the regional tennis tournament and is a state finals alternate. Pirate regional qualifiers who competed at the meet along with Salinas were Elena Robles, Monica del Bosque, Jose Salinas, Myah Medrano and Mark Zamora with coaches Rafael Delgado and Theresa Gonzalez.
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Mathis Pirate Jose Salinas took home a third-place medal at the regional tennis tournament and is a state finals alternate. Pirate regional qualifiers who competed at the meet along with Salinas were Elena Robles, Monica del Bosque, Jose Salinas, Myah Medrano and Mark Zamora with coaches Rafael Delgado and Theresa Gonzalez.
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Goliad ISD to review 59 applicants for head football coach/AD position
by Coy Slavik, Advance-Guard Editor
Apr 30, 2016 | 209 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
GOLIAD – Goliad ISD hopes to name a new head football coach/athletic director before the end of the school year. A committee comprised of Goliad ISD administrators and parent representatives began reviewing 59 applications on Thursday. "We will all review the applications over the weekend and meet again Monday to start narrowing them down for interviews," Goliad ISD Superintendent Dave Plymale said. "Typically, we're going to look at interviewing five to eight people. I'd like to narrow it down to about two people and then bring them back to tour the campuses and facilities." Two current Goliad ISD coaches, defensive coordinator Kevin Salazar and assistant Tim Collins, have applied for the position. One former Goliad assistant, current Skidmore-Tynan AD/head football coach John Livas, has also applied. Following are all the applicants for the position: • Shawn Brown, South San Antonio defensive coordinator • James Duprie, Victoria West special teams coordinator • Daryl Hobbs Sr., Houston Lee AD/head football coach • Christopher Lackey, Victoria East defensive coordinator • Joaquin Escobar, Edinburg athletic coordinator/head football coach • Robert Gail, Wills Point offensive coordinator • Joe Richard Castellano, Sinton defensive coordinator • Joel McIver, Texas City defensive coordinator • William Ross, Nueces Canyon AD/head football coach • Nicholas Williams, Lytle offensive coordinator • Corey Russell, Ardmore (Oklahoma) offensive coordinator • Tim Holt, Broken Bow (Oklahoma) AD/head football coach • Gary Carpenter, Henderson defensive coordinator • Edmund Jones, Gateway STEM (Missouri) assistant coach • Lance Ridell, Banquete AD/head football coach • Marcus Booker, San Antonio Karen Middle School teacher • Raymond Carroll Jr., Colorado High School defensive coordinator • James Bedford, Athens assistant coach • Ted Maple, Seminole defensive coordinator • William Barnes, La Vernia assistant coach • Thomas Warlick, George West assistant coach • John Livas, Skidmore-Tynan AD/head football coach • Brett Ratliff, News Diana AD/head football coach • Robert Marek, Cypress-Fairbanks defensive coordinator • Rock Stanley, Groesbeck assistant coach • Kevin Salazar, Goliad defensive coordinator • John Caffey, Rice Consolidated offensive coordinator • Heath Clawson, Carrolton Newman Smith co-offensive coordinator • Ivory Dillard, Communityco-defensive coordinator • Scott Flood, Tremper (Wisconsin) defensive coordinator • Graig Hesseltine, Ingleside AD/head football coach • Bobby Nicholson, Yoakum offensive coordinator • Greg Bagby, La Marque assistant coach • Jeff Merket, Cleburne assistant AD/head football coach • Kendall Colton, Tenaha offensive coordinator • Kane Harris, Hamshire-Fannett AD/head football coach • Scott Williams, Round Rock Westwood assistant coach • Robert Beard, Agua Dulce AD/head football coach • Bruno Mata, Yorktown assistant coach • Jason Strunk, Lubbock AD/head football coach • Scott Pugh, Granbury AD/head football coach • Lonnie Cook, Springer (New Mexico) head football coach • Vance Hale, Baytown Sterling strength coordinator • Shannon Fink, Schulenburg defensive coordinator • Tim Collins, Goliad assistant coach • Sandro Lee Cantu, Fort Worth Castleberry AD/head football coach • Wade Miller, Woodsboro AD/head football coach • Trevor Porter, Port Gibson (Mississippi) head football coach • Danny Camline, Jewitt Leon offensive coordinator • Derek Schleife, Lefors head football coach • Brad Waggoner, Georgia Tech assistant director of player personnel • Brett Schrable, Jonesboro (Arkansas) head track and field coach • Sean O'Connor, Dallas Christian College AD/head women's basketball coach • Le Hartsell, Cedar Creek offensive coordinator • Jerry Brakel, Burleson Centennial associate head football coach • Nick Rigdon, Cedar Hill assistant coach • Berry Bowman, Levelland co-offensive cordinator
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Lady Dog tracksters second at area meet
by Jeremy Pape
Apr 30, 2016 | 116 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Pictured are the Three Rivers Lady Bulldog track team, front row left to right: Tabetha Gonzalez, Gabbi Escamilla, Angel Rapstine, Kailey Huff and Kayla Shipman; and back row: Teresa Diaz, McKenzie Ruiz, Brittani Benham, Baylea Herring, Adriana Anzaldua, Carle Straube and Kiley Wilson. Not pictured in this photo is Valencia Macias.
Pictured are the Three Rivers Lady Bulldog track team, front row left to right: Tabetha Gonzalez, Gabbi Escamilla, Angel Rapstine, Kailey Huff and Kayla Shipman; and back row: Teresa Diaz, McKenzie Ruiz, Brittani Benham, Baylea Herring, Adriana Anzaldua, Carle Straube and Kiley Wilson. Not pictured in this photo is Valencia Macias.
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The Three Rivers Lady Bulldog track team competed in the area track meet on April 20. Overall, the team placed second. Many team members qualified for the regional meet, which will be held in Kingsville on April 29-30. Teresa Diaz placed second in shot put and McKenzie Ruiz finished third. Escamilla earned a silver medal in discus, while Ruiz earned the bronze. Brittani Benham placed third in triple jump and placed second in the 400. Carle Straube finished fourth in the 200. The 400-meter relay team of Tabetha Gonzales, Kiley Wilson, Straube and Benham placed third. Gonzales, Wilson, Straube then teamed with Adrianna Anzaldua to earn a silver medal in the 800 relay. The 1,600 relay team of Gonzales, Herring, Benham and Kailey Huff finished third. Huff placed second in the 800 and third in the 1,600. Anzaldua placed third in the 100. Baylea Herring finished fourth in the 300-meter hurdles. Angel Rapstine placed seventh in the 400-meter dash. Salena Lopez placed fifth in the 1,600. Mica Alvarado finished seventh in the 3,200. Gabbi Escamilla placed sixth in shot put. Valencia Macias placed fifth in discus. Straube placed seventh in long jump. Kayla Shipman finished fifth in the 300 hurdles.
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His sacrifice saved teen: Now he needs help for bionic foot to continue photography career
by Bill Clough
Apr 30, 2016 | 1196 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Carlos Salazar III
Carlos Salazar III
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BEEVILLE – When a sedan careened off an Austin street and headed for the sidewalk two years ago, Carlos Salazar III pushed a senior high school student he was photographing out of the way, saving her life. He broke his thumb and wrist — and lost a foot — in the process. “I thought I could just leap over the hood like you see in the movies,” the 39-year-old owner of Tresal Photography says. He is the son of Precinct 1 Bee County Commissioner Carlos Salazar. Instead, the car split his right foot down the middle; doctors were forced to amputate it. Now, he is the subject of a website fund-raising campaign to purchase a prosthetic foot that will allow more than the few hours he can tolerate. ___________________ It was going to be a promotional assignment in March 2014. After being graduated from A.C. Jones High School in 1995, Carlos moved to Austin 11 years ago. He started his photo business in 2010. Hoping to expand his business, Salazar sponsored an essay contest. The senior high school student who won would get a free senior-photograph shooting session. Kennedy Trevino, 17, of Beeville won, because her essay included a statement from her mother outlining Trevino’s accomplishments and that she could not afford an official senior portrait. Trevino and her mother agreed to meet Salazar at Annie and First streets in Austin for the photo shoot. It was the day before his birthday. “We started shooting pictures in a nearby coffee shop and then on the sidewalk,” he remembers. “She seemed a bit nervous. “Suddenly, I heard a car skidding its tires,” he says. “I didn’t worry about it. I thought it was probably road rage. I mean, we were in Austin. “Then I heard people yelling my name. I turned around, and the car was heading right towards us.” He turned to push Trevino out of the way and then leapt to avoid the out-of-control car. He wasn’t fast enough or high enough. The car pinned him against the building. He passed out. “When I woke up my first question was ‘How’s Kennedy?’ The second question was ‘How’s my camera?’” Trevino, her face blackened by residue from the car’s tires, was shaken but fine. So was Salazar’s Canon Mark 3 with an 85mm fl.2 lens. That’s how he broke his wrist and thumb, protecting the camera. He still shoots with it. “A stranger — I don’t know who he was — took off his shirt and tied a knot around my foot. “Is it my foot?” he asked. The stranger said, “Don’t look at it.” Doctors at the hospital said Salazar’s foot was so damaged it couldn’t be saved. He was in the hospital for more than a month. Today, he only is able to work for a few hours each day with his prosthetic foot before the pain gets to him. While he was recuperating in the hospital, he watched an online lecture about a new artificial foot offered by the BiOM company. “It’s the preferred prosthetic by soldiers injured in the Middle East,” he says. The BiOM foot emulates the human ankle, with a mechanical calf muscle. “It adds force when you walk upstairs,” he explains. Insurance, however, will not pay for the $50,000 foot because the industry considers it “experimental.” So, Salazar and his friends have created a fund-raising page on the crowd-funding website “GoFundMe.” On the page, Salazar explains that the BiOM foot would allow him to continue his work as a photographer, which often requires him to be on his feet from eight to 12 hours, often over rough terrain. “It is perfect,” he says. Those wishing to donate can access their webpage at https://www.gofundme.com/8myp6ges. To date, 80 donors have raised more than $9,000 in 15 days. One step at a time.
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