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tfer77
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March 02, 2015
Very interesting. My paternal grandmother was Ms. Driscoll's goddaughter, Clara Linney Womack Ferrell Smith...Grandma was named after Ms. Driscoll. I would truly enjoy talking to Mrs. Rebecca Rooke. Please contact me at 210-273-3673. Thank you.
Taylor
Mar 02, 2015 | 133 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Allen C. Taylor, age 90, of Pleasanton, formerly of Three Rivers, passed away peacefully Monday, February 23, 2015. Allen was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma to Frank P. and Mary A. Taylor on July 15, 1924. Allen was preceded in death by his wife, Arlita E. Taylor; daughter, Lora J. Taylor; and parents, Frank P. and Mary A. Taylor; brothers, James E. Taylor, Frank P. Taylor, Jr., Harold D. Taylor; and brothers-in-law, Billy Moore and Bill Montgomery. Allen is survived by his son, Larry Taylor (wife, Janet) of North Richland Hills, Texas; daughter, Linda Quirk (husband, Mike) of Traverse City, Michigan; daughter, Leigh Hummel (husband, Bobby) of Austin, Texas; brother-in-law, Elden D. Stalnaker; sisters-in law, Geraldine Montgomery, Beverly Moore, and Pauline Taylor. Allen was blessed with four granddaughters, Ellen Quirk, Katherine Lawyer (husband, Matthew) Jennifer Quirk, and Maegan Hummel; two grandsons, Jeffrey Taylor and Nicholas Hummel; one great-grandson, Jacob Lawyer; and one great-granddaughter, Ella Lawyer; along with five nieces and two nephews. Allen’s brother in- law, Elden D. Stalnaker, officiated. Graveside services were held at Three Rivers Cemetery at 11:00 a.m. Saturday, February 28, 2015. Honorary pallbearers were Mike Quirk, Bobby Hummel, Jeffrey Taylor, Nicholas Hummel, Matthew Lawyer, and Mike Montgomery. Anyone wishing to offer condolences, share memories or sign the guestbook may do so at www.hurleyfuneralhome.com. In lieu of flowers, please donate to either The Special Olympics or The Alzheimer’s Association. Arrangements under the direction of Hurley Funeral Home, 118 W Oaklawn Road, Pleasanton, 78064.
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Switcheroo could come at a higher price
by Jason Collins
Mar 02, 2015 | 406 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Commissioner Carlos Salazar Jr. made the case Monday that the court’s decision to move both juvenile and adult probation offices to the same building wasn’t the best idea.
Commissioner Carlos Salazar Jr. made the case Monday that the court’s decision to move both juvenile and adult probation offices to the same building wasn’t the best idea.
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Deborah Branch told commissioners that her concern was the safety of having juveniles on probation reporting to a building near the bypass.
Deborah Branch told commissioners that her concern was the safety of having juveniles on probation reporting to a building near the bypass.
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BEEVILLE – A couple of weeks ago, it seemed that county leaders were ready to renovate the old Bee Community Action Agency building and use it to house the probation departments along with possibly other offices. That is no longer the plan as two of the commissioners, one of whom voted in favor of the idea previously, now are voicing concerns. Commissioner Carlos Salazar Jr., who abstained from what would have been a unanimous vote during the last meeting, said, “The judge was of the same opinion that I was. “The court took action to sell this prime piece of real estate. “They came to us. We didn’t go to them.” The property was sold as a location for new nursing home. It’s location is ideal as it is within a block of the hospital. The money for the property, which now houses both adult and juvenile probation departments, was to be used to purchase two portable buildings for the department elsewhere in the city on county property. During the court’s Feb. 9 meeting, Commissioner Dennis DeWitt alerted the other commissioners to concerns, such as a $27,000 price increase to build the buildings and requirements that nearly the entire amount be paid before receiving the buildings. Couple that with a $10,000 initial misquote in the bid, and his concerns escalated, prompting him to alter his opinion about using Titan to contract the construction of two portable buildings. “There are too many loose dominoes in this,” he said this week. “I like things more secure.” It would only take a portion of the money from the property sale to refurbish the old BCAA building. “We have looked at every angle of this,” DeWitt said. “The more I look at the old BCAA building, the more benefits I see.” He also has altered his original plan after concerns were raised about having juvenile probation moved into the old BCAA along with adult probation. On Monday’s agenda was an item to house the juvenile department in the Dougherty building, which for now houses community affairs as one of its departments. Although this item was tabled as was any final decision, the idea seemed to be welcomed by Deborah Branch, who handles many of the juvenile cases for the district attorney’s office. “If our children are allowed to have to report a couple of blocks from the courthouse, I somehow feel they are going to be safer for many reasons,” she said. Having the department so close to downtown means there are people out and able to watch what is happening. “There are people who are going to see what children are doing—people who are going to watch them and if necessary make phone calls. “Whereas if we put them out on somewhere near a freeway, I have grave concerns. “Some of our children are all right with running away. “My biggest concern is their safety.” The core issue before commissioners right now is whether to proceed with the new plan to use the old BCAA building or go back to the old plan and purchase new portable buildings. Salazar said, “Even the $27,000 above, if it has to come from the county coffers, would still be a much better.” During that prior meeting, the court approved moving the departments to the BCAA building off the bypass and using a small portion of the money received from the sale of the land to fund repairs. Salazar said Monday, “I always felt the probation is a stand-alone department.” He said he didn’t like having even the adult probation department in the same building as, say, the community affairs department. “I don’t like that idea,” he said. “If we go with the portable buildings, you will be right next to the sheriff’s department.” His other concern was the age of the building. “We are moving into an older building, and an older building tends to break down a lot more than newer buildings. “If we have to pay $27,000 above the original, so be it,” Salazar said. Commissioner Eloy Rodriguez also voiced new concerns. “I am always weary and hesitant of someone who says it is not going to cost the county anything. “At the time it sounded like our only alternative. But it is not.” He proposed taking the money from the sale and refurbishing both that building and the old Dougherty building. “It would cost $100,000,” Rodriguez said. If the juvenile probation department is moved to the Dougherty building, it would mean moving those existing offices to the old BCAA building where there is ample room. Rodriguez said that he wanted more time to weigh the options. “What would be the best option for the county?” Time, however, is starting to run out as the agreement to sell the property draws closer. Salazar said, “The only thing that hasn’t occurred is the closing. Once the closing occurs we have six months. “There is no return. We have done sold that property to them. “That is what is upsetting and disappointing. “At the onset all of this, the portable buildings were going to be the best thing since sliced bread, and we were ready to move forward.” DeWitt reminded them that the use of the BCAA facility would allow the county to have climate controlled storage along with additional office space if needed and is the cheaper option. “That is probably a half a million dollar building that is just sitting there,” he said. “The benefits are there.” Jason Collins is the editor at the Bee-Picayune and can be reached at 343-5221, or at editor@mySouTex.com.
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Catching air
Mar 02, 2015 | 149 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Jackson Wright gets a little hand from his mother, Shanna, during the First Baptist Church School Jump Rope for Heart benefit on Thursday morning. The students here raised about $3,000.
Jackson Wright gets a little hand from his mother, Shanna, during the First Baptist Church School Jump Rope for Heart benefit on Thursday morning. The students here raised about $3,000.
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Samantha Sugarek has jumping rope down as she joins others at the school. See Page 3B for more photos.
Samantha Sugarek has jumping rope down as she joins others at the school. See Page 3B for more photos.
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