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Volleyball, cross country practice Aug. 3
Aug 01, 2015 | 152 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The Mathis High School volleyball team will begin practice from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday, Aug. 3, while the cross country boys and girls teams will start at 6 a.m. that morning. All athletes should report to the high school track. All seventh, ninth and 11th graders will need their physicals before participating in practice. Eighth, 10th and 12th graders will need to completely fill out their athletic paper work before practice. All athletic paper work must be turned in to Coach Jayme Ortiz at the boys’ high school field house.
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Eagleball highlights Pettus gridiron camp
by Kevin J. Keller
Aug 01, 2015 | 208 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Two 30-minute games of Eagleball, a game that incorporates elements of football, basketball and conditioning, highlighted the final day of the Pettus Eagle Football Camp, hosted by the Pettus coaching staff at James V. Beauchamp Stadium Tuesday through Thursday.
Two 30-minute games of Eagleball, a game that incorporates elements of football, basketball and conditioning, highlighted the final day of the Pettus Eagle Football Camp, hosted by the Pettus coaching staff at James V. Beauchamp Stadium Tuesday through Thursday.
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Dayton Doege punts the ball during a contest at the camp. Dayton is the son of Eagle head coach Jeff Doege and was the winner in his age group in the punt contest.
Dayton Doege punts the ball during a contest at the camp. Dayton is the son of Eagle head coach Jeff Doege and was the winner in his age group in the punt contest.
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Every football camp, no matter who is directing it, has its own unique style. Jeff Doege’s unique contribution is Eagleball, a game that features elements of football, basketball and conditioning. Doege brought back the Pettus Eagle Football Camp for the first time in many years this year, and with it came Eagleball. “It’s something that we put together from doing different things,” Doege said about the game. “It’s a game for a lot of conditioning. There’s a lot of continuous running around, and the kids like it. “They would love to play that every day, even the high school kids.” Eagleball games provided the capper to each day of the three-day camp which Doege hosted along with his staff at James V. Beauchamp Stadium. “As a head coach, I’ve done it all five years,” Doege said about how long he’s been using the game, which changes names depending on the nickname of the school where Doege is coaching. “I kind of incorporated it while being an assistant at some other places. I bet you it’s been the last 10 years.” Doege hosted 18 players at his first camp at Pettus, a number that pleasantly surprised the second-year coach. “I’m very happy with the turnout,” he said. “This hasn’t been done. I think it was done a long time ago. “Starting this was one of our athletic goals since I got here, to start getting camps going again. I was hoping for 15, and got 18. Very pleased.” Doege and his staff, in another unique aspect to the Pettus camp, put all 18 through drills at every position on the field. “We tried to teach them all skills,” he said. “We put them through everything; offensive line, defensive line, quarterback, we made everybody do everything. “It’s just to give them a variety because we don’t know where these kids are going to be when they get older.” The camp ran for three days, Tuesday through Thursday. The final day featured skill contests, two 30-minute long Eagleball games and the awards ceremony. “Today was kind of a skills day, getting to put all that together,” Doege said about the third day. “The first two days were really drill days. And we tried to have a little fun because that’s what camp is all about.” S-T camp draws more than 80 The Skidmore-Tynan Bobcat Football Camp wrapped up on Wednesday afternoon. The camp, which ran from Monday through Wednesday and was directed by Bobcat coach John Livas, drew a group of 82 players, including more than 50 who will play on the middle school teams this season. “I was very pleased with the number,” Livas said about the turnout. “It just shows the commitment of the parents and the kids to come out. “We had over 50 of the seventh- and eighth-graders who will play this year and then roughly 30 of the younger kids. It says a lot about the kids to come out here and participate.” Kevin J. Keller is the sports editor at the Bee-Picayune and can be reached at 343-5223, or at sports@mySouTex.com, or follow him on Twitter, @beepicsports.
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Small camp, big impact
Aug 01, 2015 | 89 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Kevin J. Keller photo.Pettus volleyball coach Brittany Talamantaz (left) throws up a ball during a setting drill at the Pettus Eagle Volleyball Camp, which was held Tuesday through Thursday at the high school gymnasium. Talamantaz and her coaching staff hosted just eight players, but those eight all received one-on-one training in setting, passing, serving and hitting over the three days.
Kevin J. Keller photo.Pettus volleyball coach Brittany Talamantaz (left) throws up a ball during a setting drill at the Pettus Eagle Volleyball Camp, which was held Tuesday through Thursday at the high school gymnasium. Talamantaz and her coaching staff hosted just eight players, but those eight all received one-on-one training in setting, passing, serving and hitting over the three days.
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Pettus volleyball coach Brittany Talamantaz (left) throws up a ball during a setting drill at the Pettus Eagle Volleyball Camp, which was held Tuesday through Thursday at the high school gymnasium. Talamantaz and her coaching staff hosted just eight players, but those eight all received one-on-one training in setting, passing, serving and hitting over the three days.
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Bailouts keep LOCSO busy
by JeniferJordan
Aug 01, 2015 | 431 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Live Oak County Sheriff's Office units patrol the area in case of incidents
Live Oak County Sheriff's Office units patrol the area in case of incidents
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LIVE OAK COUNTY – High speed chases, broken fences and stolen cars are all part of the game for Live Oak County Sheriff’s Office deputies and area patrolmen and troopers. At speeds of up to 120 mph, the latest of an upsurge in the number of high-speed chases ending in bailouts yielded the capture of 10 undocumented aliens. In the morning hours of Friday, July 27, Deputy Daniel Dobie got a call relayed from Freer police letting him know that they were in pursuit of a white Ford pickup headed northbound on U.S. Highway 59 towards George West. McMullen County Sheriff’s Office was also busy locating the vehicle, paralleling them on county roads. The border patrol was able to locate an area where the truck went through a fence on Old San Diego Road near Farm-to-Market Road 624. It seems, officials said, that the suspects switched pickups during the chase. The border patrol helicopter reported that they believed they had the vehicle in sight. Dobie, along with the border patrol chopper, was able to locate the second vehicle and radioed that he had one subject detained and that the vehicle was on the property north of the old Phillips 66 gas plant. Dobie also let dispatchers and fellow officers know that there were other subjects possibly trapped inside. Dobie, with the aid of Border Patrol and fellow law enforcement agents, successfully caught 10 undocumented individuals and released them to the Border Patrol. This is becoming an increasing frequent occurrence in the county, with at least four bailouts in the last few weeks in Live Oak County alone. The practice often involves stolen vehicles, most often from San Antonio and Houston, modified to become human-trafficking transports. Law enforcement officials sometimes tail a vehicle suspected of people-smuggling for awhile to look for suspicious behavior. Vehicles that are involved in human trafficking often take off at speeds of well over 100 mph, down county roads, making sharp U-turns and throwing up dust plumes behind them that make it difficult for officials to follow them on their serpentine routes. The vast majority of these pursuits end in bailouts after the vehicle has plowed through private and game fences and then stopped in the brush. Occupants have most often fled the scene before officers arrive. This results in considerable expense of time and resources from the various law enforcement agencies as well as expensive damages to landowners’ fences and properties.
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No Pain, No Grain: Harvest season under the hot South Texas sun
by Paul Gonzales
Aug 01, 2015 | 119 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Farmers here aren’t letting the heat stop them. They are out getting the crops in from the fields.
Farmers here aren’t letting the heat stop them. They are out getting the crops in from the fields.
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The steady flow of 18-wheelers on U.S. Highway 181 between Tynan and Mathis can mean only one thing: It’s harvest time. Farmers are out in the extreme heat harvesting their crops from sun up to sun down, sending red dust in the air behind them. And with all the rain the land received, it’s changed this year’s harvesting schedule a bit. “The milo harvest is about two weeks late,” Ben Mengers said. “We had the corn come in before the milo and that’s different than normal.” At the Tri-County Warehouse and Mill, the grain was flowing. There has been a lot more acres of grain planted this year than other crops such as cotton due to the sudden rise in price. “Grain prices are a little bit better than cotton right now,” Mengers said. “I know we’re getting a premium for our grain because it’s going to China, so actually the grain prices are better than corn which is unusual. It should be a little bit less than corn based on feed value.” The reason for the rise in price is because nearly two years ago, China stopped buying a new strain of genetically altered U.S. corn which quickly put a halt to the massive amounts they would normally purchase. In 2013, it was estimated that China turned away 1.45 million metric tons of corn beginning in late November of that year. The grain contained a gene developed by Switzerland’s Syngenta, and that MIR 162 variety wasn’t approved by China and cost $2.9 billion in corn, distiller grain and soybean revenue in the U.S. “With corn, you can get about $3.50 a bushel, and milo you can get about $5.70 a bushel. So there’s about a $2.20 difference. “And that’s a big deal. “Last year wasn’t quite that much of a difference, but the year before that, typically you would figure milo would be about 90 to 95 percent the value of corn.” China and the U.S. have been working on lifting the ban over the past couple of years and if it is lifted, expect to see corn take over the market once again. “But right now for South Texas farmers, it’s a big deal, it’s really helping them out.” So until the fields are cleared, make way for the semis roaring down the road with truckloads of grain as the harvesting season looks to continue on well in to August. And that’s a good thing.
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