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grapeape1
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April 28, 2015
No, we do not "just trust" your actions when they are done behind closed doors and with no community input. We are supposed to be 'innocent until PROVEN guilty' in this country, GISD seems to presume guilt and then wants the accused to PROVE his innocence! How is that even possible when it's ALL hearsay!??!? He said/she said accusations should be looked into BUT when these are only voiced by a disgruntled student and her mother, against a man who has EARNED THE RESPECT of most of the other students, parents and community... they should have to be proven beyond a shadow of a doubt! Kyle Taylor is not only respected for his coaching abilities, he is a good man who has been railroaded by people with an agenda! Yes there IS a great deal of "interest" in this matter, we are paying attention and we vote!!
Jacob Sanchez Rivera
Jacob Sanchez Rivera
slideshow
Jacob Sanchez Rivera
Apr 28, 2015 | 107 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Jacob Sanchez Rivera
Jacob Sanchez Rivera
slideshow
Jacob Sanchez Rivera was taken to Heaven on April 26, 2015. He was 36 years old. Jacob farmed with his dad, Cecil Wright and his brother, Isaac, at CW Farm’s and was a machinist at Puffer Sweiven. He was a loving, caring, big hearted husband, father, son and brother. He loved spending time with his family and friends. He will be greatly missed. We love you Jacob. He was preceded in death by his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Julian Dominguez, Mr. and Mrs. Antonio Rivera and Mr. Serafin Sanchez. He is survived by his wife, Bernadette G. Rivera; and two beautiful daughters, Marizabel Jayden Rivera and Lorena Renee Rivera; his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Cecil and Emery Wright; father, Antonio Rivera and brothers, Tony Rivera (Claudia Rivera) and Isaac Rivera (Irene Rivera); a sister, Grace DeMaris; and eleven nieces and nephews; uncles, Serafin and (Tina) Sanchez, Richard (Miriana) Sanchez, Robert (Adeleida) Dominguez; and an aunt, Josie Campos (Simon). Visitation will be on Thursday, April 30, 2015, from 2:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. with a rosary being recited at 7:00 p.m. at Sawyer-George Funeral Home. Visitation on Friday will begin at 9:00 a.m. and the funeral procession will depart from Sawyer-George Funeral Home at 1:30 p.m. on Friday. The Funeral Mass will be celebrated on Friday, May 1, 2015, at 2:00 p.m. at St. Peter, Prince of the Apostles Catholic Church. Interment will follow in the Robstown Memorial Park Cemetery Funeral services entrusted to Sawyer-George Funeral Home, Inc., 12497 Leopard Street, Corpus Christi, Texas 78410. (361) 242-3205 Please visit our web site at www.sawyergeorgefuneralhome.com.
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Funny money may reach George West
by Gary Kent
Apr 28, 2015 | 47 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
BEEVILLE – Two men suspected of passing bogus $20 bills in Bee and Live Oak counties were placed in the Bee County Jail Tuesday afternoon. Police Chief Joe Treviño said 32-year-old Richard Lopez and 22-year-old Anthony Rodrigues were taken into custody just before 2 p.m. by Detective Sgt. Chris Vasquez after he stopped them in Beeville. Investigators here were first tipped off to a counterfeit problem after officers with the George West Police Department started receiving reports of businesses receiving phony twenties. Then some of the bills started showing up in Beeville. The local detective said officers began to suspect the two men, and they contacted agents with the U.S. Secret Service to share their information. Treviño said federal agents also shared the information they had gathered and local investigators began to watch the suspects. On Tuesday, detectives were watching the two men when they visited a local vendor, and after they left the business officers checked and confirmed that the two had passed counterfeit bills at that location. Vasquez then went after the two, knowing that at least one of the suspects was wanted on local warrants. Treviño said Vasquez stopped the vehicle the two men were riding in on U.S. Highway 181, about a mile from the bypass. Inside the vehicle, Vasquez found a computer printer suspected of being used to make the bills and several of the counterfeit bills. Lopez and Rodrigues were taken to the Beeville Police Department where they were questioned and told they would be charged with forgery and tampering with evidence. Both charges are third degree felonies punishable by up to 10 years in prison and a $10,000 fine. Treviño said Lopez also was held on three Class C misdemeanor warrants issued by a justice of the peace court. Rodrigues also was charged with forgery and three Class C misdemeanor warrants issued by municipal court. The misdemeanor charges are punishable by fines of up to $500 each. Bonds were set at $20,000 for both suspects on the forgery charges, and Lopez’s bond was $10,000 on the tampering with evidence charge. Also, bond was $700 for Rodrigues on a theft charge he was facing. Both men were still in jail Thursday morning. Investigators said the suspects have been living in Beeville but were known to regularly travel back and forth between here and George West. Treviño said the suspects also face possible federal charges in connection with the counterfeiting operation. Secret Service agents are following up on their investigation. Gary Kent is a reporter at the Bee-Picayune and can be reached at 358-2550, ext. 120, or at reporter@mySouTex.com.
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A footnote in time: Story of the Dobie Ranch
by Bill Clough
Apr 28, 2015 | 30 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
“I was born...in Live Oak County...” ...writes author J. Frank Dobie in his biography, Some Part of Myself. “I was born in a three-room whitewashed ranch house.” That was 127 years ago. Today, little is left of the homestead. The caliche stone structure is rubble, and the familiar ravages of the seasons and the clock have so damaged the remaining wood building that it’s a danger to enter. He sold the ranch in the early 1950s. No one of the six men who bought it has any idea of living upon it. They are oil men, not ranchers; they bought it as a hunting place and as an investment...no matter who holds title to the ground, my roots into it will be ineradicable. As local historian Jimmy Jackson points out, there still is evidence of the Dobie occupancy. While the front porch is sagging, where water falling off the tin roof hits the ground are lilies first planted by the Dobie family. Truth to tell, Dobie was not all that enamored. The richest days of my life have not been spent on this ranch, not at all. So, it is a historical, if literary, footnote. Dobie often visited the ranch on camping trips, but the climate did not agree. The summers are scorching; for nine months of the year the air is enervating...One can waste his heart out there vainly hoping for rain. He showed little concern about the ranch itself. As a matter of fact, we did absolutely nothing to restore it. While some raise the question of renovation, Jackson says the building is beyond renovation. To drive with him down to the end of a road, then to a gate, then to the end of another road, it is not difficult to reach the same conclusion. “You’re going to try it, then,” he asks as a visitor finally gets the courage to climb inside the doorway. The ceilings are high—a defense against the heat. And while the floors look as if they would collapse, they are sturdy. One can only imagine what it was like inside the stone building. The fire in the fireplace would talk to me as no other fire in any other fireplace can talk. What wisdom did the flames confide with a youngsters who later would become such a writer of renown? Did Dobie ever plan a book titled “Conversations With Coals?” And yet, years after he left, Dobie said if he were wealthy, he would buy the ranch, modernize the house and live there during the hunting season. His companions, he wrote, would be books and a typewriter. Not quite ignored, the ranch house. But while it did not constitute a high priority, the land itself was paramount. The land remains. A thousand, 10,000 years hence, the Dobie ranch will be where it was before...It will have other names, be divided and then be absorbed. Still, he wrote, it is a measure of ground to which I am more closely akin than to any other on earth. The building is almost gone; Dobie’s writing remains. Bill Clough is a reporter at the Bee-Picayune and can be reached at 343-5222, or at beepic@mySouTex.com.
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