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NFL Punt, Pass & Kick comes back to Beeville
by Mackey Torres
Jul 05, 2015 | 126 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
BEEVILLE – After being away for more than 20 years, the NFL Punt, Pass & Kick contest is making a return to Beeville. Kevin J. Keller, the competition director, will run the event. However, Keller credits a pair of Beeville Lions Club members for bringing it back. “I can’t take credit for the idea of bringing it back; that credit has to go to Kathy Taylor and Cheryl Meynig,” Keller said. “They brought the idea to me and asked if I could help them get it off the ground. “They wanted to bring it back because it’s a fun event for kids, and it’s free for everyone who participates.” The event will consist of kids competing individually against their peers in punting, passing and kicking contests, which are based on distance and accuracy. There are five age groups (6-7, 8-9, 10-11, 12-13, 14-15) separated between boys and girls. The top four first place finishers in each boys’ and girls’ age groups will advance to sectional competition in October, with the location to be announced later. The Beeville Lions Club will handle registration and concessions at the event, while Keller will be in charge of the on-field portion, with assistance from Trojan football coaches and players. “I wanted to get the players involved because I know that will be a cool thing for the kids who are participating to have the boys they watch on Fridays there at the event,” Keller said. Keller and the Lions Club hope that this isn’t just a one-time thing and that it’s back for good. In hopes of making this an annual event, Keller is approaching it with the old cliche that “if something is worth doing, it’s worth doing right.” “I’m going to strive to make this a fun event that the kids really enjoy, and I know I can speak on behalf of the Lions Club when I say that,” Keller said. “If you run an event like this, and you do it the right way, people want to be part of it, and they want to participate.” The competition will take place at 7 p.m. Wednesday, July 15, at Veterans Memorial Stadium on the campus of Beeville’s A.C. Jones High School. Registration is free to all players, with registration forms available at the Beeville Bee-Picayune office. Players can also register on the day of the event at the stadium. Online registrations are being accepted at nflppk.com/competitions/register/index/20989. The entire event won’t cost the parents a dime. Plus, it’s a way to get kids active during the summer. This event is for the kids, so Keller hopes that he can create an atmosphere that they can enjoy themselves in, similar to one he had experienced. “I just hope the kids have fun when they get under those lights at the stadium,” Keller said. “I know that when I was a kid, it was a big deal to get to do anything under the lights at the high school stadium, so I’m hoping that feeling has funneled down to this generation. “I just want them to have fun and enjoy themselves. And, you know, a little competition never hurt anyone.” Mackey Torres is the regional editor at the Bee-Picayune and can be reached at 343-5219, or at regional@mySouTex.com.
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Car seat safety
Jul 05, 2015 | 51 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Bill Clough photo.Four-year-old Jorge Madrigal is fitting cofrrectly inn a car seat at the carseat satety demonstration Tuesday agfternoonat the Police Department's Training Center. Helping him sit correctly in the seat are Mickie Ochoa, left, co-owmer of Angel Care, and Robert hanson, a technician with the Texas Municipal Police Association in Austin. Seventy percent of the carseats, axccrding to the Texas Department of Transportation, are incorrectly installed because either users do not read the instructions or don't understand them. Another carseat safety inspection will be from 9 a.m. to noon July 21 at then facility, 608 West Milam.
Bill Clough photo.Four-year-old Jorge Madrigal is fitting cofrrectly inn a car seat at the carseat satety demonstration Tuesday agfternoonat the Police Department's Training Center. Helping him sit correctly in the seat are Mickie Ochoa, left, co-owmer of Angel Care, and Robert hanson, a technician with the Texas Municipal Police Association in Austin. Seventy percent of the carseats, axccrding to the Texas Department of Transportation, are incorrectly installed because either users do not read the instructions or don't understand them. Another carseat safety inspection will be from 9 a.m. to noon July 21 at then facility, 608 West Milam.
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Four-year-old Jorge Madrigal is sitting correctly in a car seat at a safety demonstration Tuesday afternoon at the Police Department’s Training Center. Helping him sit correctly in the seat are Mickie Ochoa, co-owner of Angel Care, and Robert Hanson, a technician with the Texas Municipal Police Association in Austin. Seventy percent of the cars seats, according to the Texas Department of Transportation, are incorrectly installed because either users do not read the instructions or don’t understand them. Another car seat safety inspection will be from 9 a.m. to noon July 21 at that facility, 608 W. Milam St. Those with youngsters are encouraged to come out.
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Refugio teacher joins Fling expedition
by Tim Delaney
Jul 05, 2015 | 91 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
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The Fling, the vessel used for the first ever Coast to Classroom Teacher Expedition, prepares to dock after a week-long cruise along the Texas Gulf Coast. Twenty area teachers, including one from Refugio, participated. The Fling docked Thursday, June 25, after navigating under the Corpus Christi Harbor Bridge.
Tim Delaney photo The Fling, the vessel used for the first ever Coast to Classroom Teacher Expedition, prepares to dock after a week-long cruise along the Texas Gulf Coast. Twenty area teachers, including one from Refugio, participated. The Fling docked Thursday, June 25, after navigating under the Corpus Christi Harbor Bridge.
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CORPUS CHRISTI – Teaching out of a book is all right, but nothing beats real life experience. And that was the allure that convinced Refugio High School teacher Tammy Reeves to become one of 20 teachers who participated in the first ever Coast to Classroom Teacher Expedition. Reeves, 30, boarded the vessel Fling for a weeklong journey along the Texas Coast at Freeport on Monday, June 22. Aboard the craft, she was able to work with field scientists, who are familiar with everything from birds, bays, estuaries, tidal inlets and wetlands. “None of us got seasick. It was a nice, smooth ride. We had good captains,” Reeves said. Reeves said the Fling sailed to the Aransas Wildlife Refuge where she viewed various birds. She said other spots visited included Estes Flats (grass beds), the Laguna Madre Field Station, Port O’Connor, Lydia Ann Lighthouse, San Jose Island and the west side of Mustang Island. “We saw dolphins as we cruised by Copano Bay,” she said. Beside birding, the group of teachers went kayaking, collected water and sediment samples and analyzed water quality Reeves, who teaches 10th, 11th and 12th grades at Refugio High School, said she really benefitted from the cruise. “I’ve got tons of resources, lesson plans, field guides and books,” Reeves said. She plans to add a year-long Earth space science class to her other classes this fall to offer an option for fourth-year science at Refugio High School. “The teacher expedition was a great opportunity for me to gain knowledge about the local ecology to bring back to my students. Working with so many teachers from around the coastal bend, many of whom also teach in smaller rural schools like Refugio, gave me the opportunity to share ideas and collaborate with teachers in the area who I hope to work with in the future,” she said. The Coast to Classroom Teacher Expedition was hosted by the Harte Research Institute and funded by the Ed Rachal Foundation. The Harte Institute had sent out emails to several school districts in the area inviting teachers to attend the cruise. Superintendent Jack Gaskins forwarded the email to Reeves, who jumped at the chance. “Our kids know more about coral reefs and the rainforest than they know about the Texas Coast,” said Jay Tarkington, Outreach program director with the TAMU-CC Center for Coastal Studies, who managed the workshop. “A big part of this expedition was to get these teachers out into the field to highlight our Texas coastal wetlands. We wanted to show these teachers environmental changes along the Texas Coast, but we also want to provide them with educational materials, things that can help them when they return to school in the fall,” Tarkington said. “Overall this ‘cruise’ was a great way to get me excited about the upcoming school year. I am always more enthusiastic about an upcoming school year when I have new knowledge, ideas, methods, activities, and labs to share with my students,” Reeves said. Reeves said the numerous activities on and off the Fling led to material she could use in her chemistry, biology AP, and Earth space science classes. “There was something for everyone on this trip no matter what science they taught or at what level,” she said. “This was an experience I am so grateful to have been a part of and hope this program continues.”
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Slide finish at Kids College
Jul 05, 2015 | 102 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Karyssa Abrigo holds her nose as she slides down the inflatable slide and into the water last Friday. This was the last day of Kids College at Coastal Bend College and the youngsters had a reason to celebrate. Kids College is a chance for students to learn from professional staff. They are exposed to careers in all five of the high school endorsement programs: STEM, Business and Industry, Fine Arts, Public Service, Multidisciplinary.
Karyssa Abrigo holds her nose as she slides down the inflatable slide and into the water last Friday. This was the last day of Kids College at Coastal Bend College and the youngsters had a reason to celebrate. Kids College is a chance for students to learn from professional staff. They are exposed to careers in all five of the high school endorsement programs: STEM, Business and Industry, Fine Arts, Public Service, Multidisciplinary.
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A fraction of a second later Shelby Slavinski hit the water at the end of this inflatable water slide.
A fraction of a second later Shelby Slavinski hit the water at the end of this inflatable water slide.
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Mickayla Banda looks to be enjoying herself as she slides down an inflatable water slide in the Coastal Bend College parking lot last Friday. This was the last day of Kids College and what better way to celebrate the end of lessons that playing in the water.
Mickayla Banda looks to be enjoying herself as she slides down an inflatable water slide in the Coastal Bend College parking lot last Friday. This was the last day of Kids College and what better way to celebrate the end of lessons that playing in the water.
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Friday, June 26 was the last day of Kids College at Coastal Bend College and the youngsters had a reason to celebrate. Kids College is a chance for students to learn from professional staff. They are exposed to careers in all five of the high school endorsement programs: STEM, Business and Industry, Fine Arts, Public Service, Multidisciplinary.
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Sent to do mission work
by By Gary Conklin Pastor, Faith Lutheran Church
Jul 05, 2015 | 50 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Today, I would like for us to take a look at what I call a sending out story. This story is from the Gospel of Mark, found in Mark 6:1-13. Here, we find Jesus back home from a successful road trip. His disciples have followed Him and seen Him minister in many ways and preach about the kingdom of God. All has been successful while away from his home territory. At this point the disciples are probably thinking, “This mission stuff is a piece of cake!” Then in order to finish the training, Jesus brings them back home to a place where everyone knows him. Did this turn out to be successful also? Well, of course not! The people in His hometown reject Him and showed little faith, therefore we read that just a few were healed. So what is the lesson here—that we cannot do mission and outreach in our own towns? I think not. I think Jesus used this as a teaching experience for His disciples and for us. I think He is trying to show here, that spreading the word of God’s kingdom will not always be easy or meet with success. In fact, sometimes we will be downright rejected. So, what happens next? Jesus sends out His disciples and gives them instructions. Jesus does great deeds and of power and gives His disciples authority over evil, sickness and healing. Yet, none of this power just happens; it is received by faith. The faith comes in when Jesus tells the disciples to go out without money or supplies so they will be dependent on how others receive them. Do you have that kind of faith? Think about it; when we are sent out from our church services or assemblies on Sunday morning, we are sent to witness and to heal; we are asked to be vulnerable, to be dependent on the reception of others. This can be a very scary thing! But Jesus does not send us out alone; He sends the Holy Spirit with us. You see, the Spirit is always there between us all; between Jesus and God the Father, between Jesus and us, between you and me, and between us and those to whom we are sent (Sunday and Seasons Preaching 2015 – July 5, 2015). No matter how hard our mission work may be, it is only our job to plant the seed. The Holy Spirit will be with us to cultivate the crop. We must step out in faith. So with Jesus’ instructions from Mark 6:1-13, brothers and sisters, go out this week and spread the healing news of Jesus Christ with great faith!
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