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Sheriff’s office asks ranchers to help keep cows off roadways
by Christina Rowland
Jan 14, 2013 | 2177 views | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Contributed photo
A sheriff’s deputy responded to a cow call on  FM 797 outside of Skidmore on Jan. 4.  The deputy had to find where the cow belonged before leaving the scene. The sheriff’s office is pleading with livestock owners to mend their fences and call the sheriff’s office and get their information into the cattle book.
Contributed photo A sheriff’s deputy responded to a cow call on FM 797 outside of Skidmore on Jan. 4. The deputy had to find where the cow belonged before leaving the scene. The sheriff’s office is pleading with livestock owners to mend their fences and call the sheriff’s office and get their information into the cattle book.
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Why do cows like to cross the road? Nobody is really sure, but the Bee County Sheriff’s Department knows that those cows that like to cross the road are a pain.

Lt. Ronnie Jones said that the dispatcher gets multiple calls a week about cows being in the road in Bee County.

The sheriff’s department already has a limited staff, and taking time out of an officer’s day to move a cow out of the road is both time consuming and expensive.

If a cow gets out of a fence near Pettus, it takes an officer half an hour just to get there, and then the officer still has to locate the cow and attempt to find where the cow belongs.

What seems like a simple call for a cow in the road can turn into a two-hour ordeal, and that means that officer is not available for other important calls that might be made.

Jones said there are a couple things people can do to help out the sheriff’s department.

“We strongly encourage anyone who has cows to call the sheriff’s department and get their cattle brand in the cattle book,” he said.

This lets the officer who finds a cow contact the owners quickly instead of just walking up and down the road looking for a fence where they can put the cow back.

“Ranchers should check their fences routinely,” Jones said.

Fences don’t last forever, and regular maintenance is required; otherwise, a rancher can come out to find a fence with no cows behind it.

Cows in the road cannot only be a time-consuming endeavor for an officer but a danger to motorists.

If a car hits a cow, it is possible the vehicle could be totaled.

In some cases, cows found on highways can also lead to fines for the owners.

The sheriff’s office is asking ranchers to please take note of their cows and check their fences.

Let the sheriff’s deputies spend their time responding to calls where people actually need help, not calls to move a cow out of the road.
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