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Obliterates take local punk rock to San Antonio
by Paul Gonzales
Nov 22, 2012 | 1610 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
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From left, Adan Gonzales and Albert Salazar of the band Obliterates rocked The Korova Nov. 10 in San Antonio as part of the second annual Fall Fall Fall Fest. The event had over 300 enthusiastic attendees that packed the Stanley Kubrick themed venue.
Paul Gonzales photo From left, Adan Gonzales and Albert Salazar of the band Obliterates rocked The Korova Nov. 10 in San Antonio as part of the second annual Fall Fall Fall Fest. The event had over 300 enthusiastic attendees that packed the Stanley Kubrick themed venue.
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San Antonio — When you walk in to the Korova, 107 E. Martin St., San Antonio, the first thing you notice is all the Stanley Kubrick paintings, prints and posters for his films.

The entire place is a shrine to late director with posters from “Full Metal Jacket” and “2001: A Space Odyssey” plastered all over.

Strange artistic representations of “The Shining” are everywhere.

White mannequins, meant to invoke the furniture from “A Clockwork Orange,” jut out of the top of the walls.

The main room was large and bright, and it was a really beautiful venue, with the stage at the very back, lights flashing and bathing the band jamming in bright yellows, blues and greens.

The Korova didn’t seem like a place to host a mass of punk bands.

It was too pretty. Too bright. Too pristine.

But there, off to the right was a doorway.

And through the doorway was a flight of dingy black steps that led down into darkness filled with kids in black shirts, skinny jeans and leather jackets.

And, there in the basement of the venue, I knew I was in the right place.

Obliterates, Adan Gonzales, Albert Salazar, Marcos Montez and Michael Segovia, tore through their set, ripping through some of their classics at a furious pace.

The small but zealous crowd of San Antonians rocked along with their newest songs, “Waiting to Go” and “Dead Formats.”

And after a last-minute drummer change a few days before, no one seemed to notice as they sounded solid and cocksure, barreling through their set at a punk-paced 20 minutes.

Their homely equipment left a little to be desired as the small, mic’d amps buzzed and were uneven, even for a gritty band such as Obliterates.

But one could argue it only added to the charm.

The crowd grew after each song, and at the end, the band got the applause they sweated for and left an indubitable boot print on the San Antonio punk scene.

It was a performance “A Clockwork Orange’s” Alex would be proud of.

Obliterates are continuing to play festivals and benefits in the next few months, and you can keep tabs on the band at www.facebook.com/obliterates.rocknroll.

Paul Gonzales is the entertainment writer at the Bee-Picayune and can be reached at 358-2550, ext. 116, or at thescene@mySouTex.com.
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