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Grass fires prompt burn ban
by Jason Collins
Jan 02, 2013 | 1767 views | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Gary Kent photos
Firemen throughout Bee County have been battling grass and brush fires for days. This fire Friday afternoon brought numerous trucks to the Old St. Mary’s Road east of the city. A landowner helped firefighters get to the trouble spots as brush trucks attacked the blaze from several locations. Members of the Beeville Volunteer Fire Department are urging all residents to be careful with anything that could spark a grass fire. This fire was started when a resident of the area was burning trash.
Gary Kent photos Firemen throughout Bee County have been battling grass and brush fires for days. This fire Friday afternoon brought numerous trucks to the Old St. Mary’s Road east of the city. A landowner helped firefighters get to the trouble spots as brush trucks attacked the blaze from several locations. Members of the Beeville Volunteer Fire Department are urging all residents to be careful with anything that could spark a grass fire. This fire was started when a resident of the area was burning trash.
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Grass fires like the one on right have prompted county leaders to enact a burn ban.
Grass fires like the one on right have prompted county leaders to enact a burn ban.
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BEEVILLE — Bee County commissioners Monday ordered a ban on outdoor burning starting immediately.

The unanimous vote came after hearing from Robert Bridge, emergency management coordinator.

Bridge said that his concern, and also of the area fire chiefs, was the amount of dead, flammable grass and other debris on the ground.

“After consulting with various sources including the computer index KBDI (Keetch-Byram Drought Index) and several of the fire chiefs, it was the consensus that we implement a burn ban at your will,” Bridge said during the court’s meeting Monday morning.

“Even though, today, it is a misty day thanks to the good Lord, the fuel is very dry, and the conditions are not good for the prevention of fires.”

The drought index currently places Bee County at an index of 606, which is the threshold that many county leaders use to implement burn bans.

Surrounding county courts also have implemented similar burn bans because of the drought.

“I think we are the only county in this area that doesn’t have a burn ban,” said County Judge David Silva.

Commissioners had previously banned the use of aerial fireworks this holiday season. This includes bottle rocket style fireworks with fins and sticks but not ground fireworks such as Blackcats.

Commissioners also:

• Approve a proclamation declaring January as Crime Stoppers Month,

• Approved a resolution allowing the sheriff’s office to apply for the Border Star Grant.

• Approved the new state comptroller mileage reimbursement rate of 51 cents.

• Heard an update from Commissioner Dennis DeWitt on the status of the Medio Creek culvert replacement. Oil field companies previously agreed to replace the culvert with a bridge that will span just more than half a mile on West King Lane in north Bee County. Crews are still working on the design of the new bridge.

Jason Collins is the editor at the Bee-Picayune and can be reached at 358-2550, ext. 121, or at editor@mySouTex.com.
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