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Bee Cab at your service
by Lindsey Shaffer
Mar 12, 2014 | 132 views | 0 0 comments | 20 20 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Lindsey Shaffer photo 

Karl Kreindl stands next to his taxi cab. Kreindl, a retired truck driver, started Bee Cab Services four months ago. He drives both visitors and residents, servicing local hotels and bars as well as providing airport service to San Antonio and Corpus Christi.
Lindsey Shaffer photo Karl Kreindl stands next to his taxi cab. Kreindl, a retired truck driver, started Bee Cab Services four months ago. He drives both visitors and residents, servicing local hotels and bars as well as providing airport service to San Antonio and Corpus Christi.
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Karl Kreindl comes across as a 50-something-year-old, with an old soul, a youthful smile and a thousand stories hiding behind his kind eyes.

One would never guess that Kreindl, who is actually 73, has been in the transportation field most of his life, retiring just last year from a 35-year trucking career.

Kreindl moved from the country of Austria, where he was born, to Canada, accompanied by an uncle.

With high hopes of becoming a professional truck driver, Kreindl got a job with large construction company on Vancouver Island.

He met his wife, Sheena, in Canada. The two have been married for 35 years.

Armed with two cars each, Kreindl and his wife began multiple cab services during their time in Canada.

“I started three cab companies in Canada; in Calgary, Toronto and Victoria, British Columbia,” he said. Kreindl raved about the success of his cab companies. “Cabs in Canada are big money, like New York,” he said.

He credits his supportive wife for much of their success. “I couldn’t have done it without her help.”

After 15 years of working as a truck driver and running cab companies in Canada, Kreindl moved to the U.S., along with his wife and their 5-year-old son, Scott.

Kreindl worked for 20 more years as a truck driver before finally retiring, just a year ago.

After 35 years, and hundreds of thousands of miles, Kreindl boasts a clean driving record. “No accidents and no tickets,” he said proudly, “I retired undefeated!”

Sheena, Kreindl’s wife, accepted a job offer in Kenedy two years ago, and the family moved once again. “Sheena is an RN; she works in the prison system,” Kreindl explained.

With the success of his past cab companies in mind, Kreindl decided to start a cab business in Beeville.

After waiting four months for his license, Kreindl was eager to start the cab service when his license finally arrived in October. He did so, officially, on Nov. 6, 2013—four months ago.

Kreindl said the only advertising he did consisted of handing out business cards and talking to people, letting the news of Bee Cab Services travel by word of mouth. He just recently gave his business a simple Facebook page, and the number for his cab service also pops up in a Google search.

His four months in the Beeville area have been quite successful—maybe even too successful.

“I have been so busy that I am now in the process of getting another car,” he said. “I haven’t had a day off since I started; I work seven days a week, from 6 a.m. to midnight.”

Kreindl services all local hotels, does “bar sweeps” nightly, drives into George West often, and even offers airport service to San Antonio and Corpus Christi. “I would like to branch out into Kenedy, too,” he said.

Picking up and dropping off are not Kreindl’s only concerns. “I do a bar sweep at the end of the night to see if anyone needs a ride,” he said, “and I always wait until the person is inside their home before I leave; it’s a safety thing. I make sure everyone gets home safely.”

“A lot of people who have multiple DWIs and no longer have a license really appreciate what I’m doing,” he added.

After a second car is up and running, Kreindl said he plans to become a 24-hour service.

“Some people think I’m packing it in, but I’m here for the long run,” he laughed. “I like driving. I’m used to being on the highway; I enjoy it.”

With the comfortable ride comes a safe trip, and a kind driver who might just share a story or two.

Lindsey Shaffer is the regional editor at the Bee-Picayune and can be reached at 358-2550, ext. 119, or at regional@mySouTex.com.
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