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To remember and honor: POW/MIA flag raised on courthouse flagpole
May 03, 2014 | 99 views | 0 0 comments | 16 16 recommendations | email to a friend | print
County Judge David Silva, left, looks on with others as the POW/MIA flag is raised on the courthouse lawn Thursday morning just below the American flag. Silva said that the flag would be a reminder that not all of those soldiers who fight overseas come home.
County Judge David Silva, left, looks on with others as the POW/MIA flag is raised on the courthouse lawn Thursday morning just below the American flag. Silva said that the flag would be a reminder that not all of those soldiers who fight overseas come home.
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Salutes are offered as the flag is raised to honor American prisoners of war and those labeled missing in action. “This flag will help us to never forget,” County Judge David Silva said.
Salutes are offered as the flag is raised to honor American prisoners of war and those labeled missing in action. “This flag will help us to never forget,” County Judge David Silva said.
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BEEVILLE – The black and white flag was raised in a spot of honor just below the U.S. flag in a ceremony on the courthouse lawn Thursday at 10 a.m.

County Judge David Silva said that this prisoner of war flag, being flown throughout the month of May, is raised to remember those soldiers lost overseas.

“This flag will help us to never forget,” Silva said. “It will serve to help us remember that some folks never came home.

“They never saw the coast of California flying in.

“That is something that is very precious.”

The idea of flying the flag came from Commissioner Eloy Rodriguez, who saw it flown outside another courthouse.

Rodriguez, during a March 24 meeting when he proposed and was given approval for the idea, said, “I thought ‘what a nice gesture...’

“The POW/MIA flag recognizes all those Americans who were prisoners of war or missing in action.”

The flag will fly this month on all county flagpoles, thanks to court approval.

The POW/MIA flag contains a white disk bearing in black silhouette the bust of a man, watchtower with a guard on patrol, and a strand of barbed wire. Above the disk are the white letters POW and MIA framing a white five-pointed star; below the disk is a black and white wreath above the white motto: “You are not forgotten.”

On Aug. 10, 1990, the U.S. Congress passed a law which recognized it “as the symbol of our nation’s concern and commitment to resolving as fully as possible the fates of Americans still prisoner, missing and unaccounted for in Southeast Asia, thus ending the uncertainty for their families and the nation.”

Other than “Old Glory,” this flag is the only flag ever to fly over the White House, having been displayed in this place of honor on National POW/MIA Recognition Day since 1982.
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