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Lozano recalls lessons learned in scouting
by Jason Collins
May 09, 2014 | 124 views | 0 0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print
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State Rep. J.M. Lozano praised the work of the scout masters and the scouts during the Friends of Scouting breakfast at First United Methodist Church on Tuesday morning. Behind him on the right is the master of ceremonies Sheriff Carlos Carrizales Jr.
Jason Collins photo State Rep. J.M. Lozano praised the work of the scout masters and the scouts during the Friends of Scouting breakfast at First United Methodist Church on Tuesday morning. Behind him on the right is the master of ceremonies Sheriff Carlos Carrizales Jr.
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BEEVILLE – Just how does one solve most of the world’s problems?

State Rep. J.M. Lozano said Tuesday morning that one must look no further than the Boy Scout motto and oath.

Lozano, speaking at the 7 a.m. Friends of Scouting breakfast at First United Methodist Church, asked, “Can you imagine if every elected official abided by that oath? Can you imagine if every elected official abided by scout law?”

That oath and motto calls for youth to be, among other things, obedient to God and country, kind, cheerful and trustworthy.

“When Boy Scouts was created, it was really an answer to the problem of folks leaving rural America for urban areas and the fear that men were losing patriotism and individualism,” Lozano said.

Organizations like the scouts instill values in children that help them succeed.

“No matter how much money we put back into schools, you know sometimes we hit a roadblock,” he said.

“If the child does not want to learn, if the child does not have a good parent at home, they are lost.

“We all see those children in high school today.

“They are seniors.

“We lost them.

“It is almost going to be impossible to get them back.

“If they had the foundation the Boy Scouts instill, they would have weathered that storm.”

In high schools, a lot is said of peer pressure, but not all of it is bad.

“Adults can speak at Red Ribbon Week and say, ‘Don’t do drugs,’ but if it is a friend next to him in class, that is a greater influence. The more Boy Scouts, we have in classrooms the better our children are going to be.”

The state representative grew up in a small town himself and for a brief period was a member of the scouts.

“For two years we had Cub Scouts in Premont,” Lozano said. “Our scoutmaster or volunteer worked for Mobil (oil company).

“In that one year I flew on a single-engine plane.

“I got to fly over the skies of South Texas. In that one flight I learned something I would use later in life that probably saved my life.

“We heard a loud pop in the engine. I jumped and as a little boy I started to cry.

“(My friend) looked at me and said, ‘It’s OK; it is usually louder.’”

When Lozano was in graduate school, he decided to try flying again—as a way to conquer a fear of heights.

“I decided in graduate school I had time in the day to get my pilot’s license in San Antonio,” he said. “Before you get your actual license you have to fly solo.

“I am over downtown San Antonio coming in to land, so they vector me over Highway 281, and I hear a pop in that motor when she said, ‘Descend to 1,200 feet.’

“I reduced the throttle—I guess I did it too fast—and that engine backfired, and I heard a pop.

“I remember hearing (my friend) tell me, ‘It’s OK; it is usually louder.’

These experiences are what so many scouts take with them through life.

Eagle Scout James Ames summed it up during his comments to the crowd of about 30 people, “It taught me how to be trustworthy, how to be loyal, how to be kind, obedient and brave.

“I would not be the person I am today without learning those things from scouts—learning those things to represent my life as an Eagle Scout.”

Lozano adds, “Being here with the Boy Scouts always gives me hope that there are youths that aren’t lost.”

Jason Collins is the editor at the Bee-Picayune and can be reached at 358-2550, ext. 121, or at editor@mySouTex.com.
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