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Student art sale draws crowd of buyers for unique finds
by Jason Collins
May 01, 2013 | 1604 views | 0 0 comments | 16 16 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Elizabeth Torres looks closely at one of the ceramic pieces made by her sister, Esmeralda, this semester and now up for sale at the  student and faculty show and sale at Coastal Bend College.
Elizabeth Torres looks closely at one of the ceramic pieces made by her sister, Esmeralda, this semester and now up for sale at the student and faculty show and sale at Coastal Bend College.
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Whitney Bohac is all smiles as bids came in for her artwork Wednesday. To her right is a painting of fruit which sold during the student and faculty show and sale at Coastal Bend College.
Whitney Bohac is all smiles as bids came in for her artwork Wednesday. To her right is a painting of fruit which sold during the student and faculty show and sale at Coastal Bend College.
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Jason Collins photo
Darlene Stockton, a kinesiology instructor at CBC, looks over the student artwork on display at the Coastal Bend College art gallery.
Jason Collins photo Darlene Stockton, a kinesiology instructor at CBC, looks over the student artwork on display at the Coastal Bend College art gallery.
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The young college artists meandered about the gallery at Coastal Bend College Wednesday morning.

Each was smiling, hoping that one of the potential buyers would take a liking to their pieces.

This is the first of two gallery showings and sales held at the college’s gallery this year — each done at a semester’s end.

Jayne Duryea, fine arts division chair, said that 80 artists have their pieces in the show — each made during this past semester.

In education speak, this is called Student Learning Outcome. For the students though, this is a boost in their morale as they see that their hard work has paid off — literally.

Each piece, whether made of ceramic, glass, paint or graphite, went anywhere from $20 to $150 depending upon what the artist and the buyer could negotiate.

Esmeralda Torres was there with her sister, Elizabeth Torres, admiring the work of her fellow students.

Esmeralda doesn’t plan on being an artist, but she is enjoying her time in the program.

“I am going into radiology,” she said. “I am just taking the class because I enjoy it.”

A little later that morning, Whitney Bohac would begin smiling and wouldn’t quit until she sold four of her five paintings.

“The day is still young though,” she said as she pointed out the last remaining piece of hers not yet sold.

It is an abstract piece comprised mainly of black lines and a smattering of colored squares.

“It was the hardest painting ever,” she said.

Her biggest fan – well, it was her mother – wanted to offer some encouragement.

Abylene Bohac said that she remembers the amount of work her daughter put into the class.

“I know good stuff when I see it. She had more talent than she thought,” she said.

Each painting represents to this mother both hers and her daughter’s “blood, sweat and tears.”

The pieces will have a special place in her home as reminders to her daughter of just what can be accomplished with persistence.

“I am going to hang them all over the house,” she said.

By early that afternoon, art collectors had paid a total of $1,035.

For those who missed these first few hours of the sale, there is still plenty of time to make offers and support these budding artists.

The Simon Michael Art Gallery is open from 8 a.m. until 4 p.m. Monday though Thursday. Those wishing to make an offer should call Duryea at 361-354-2322.

Jason Collins is the editor at the Bee-Picayune and can be reached at 358-2550, ext. 121, or at editor@mySouTex.com.
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