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Moreno School invites dads to ‘show up for class’
Sep 14, 2012 | 1650 views | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print
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Moreno Middle School Principal Joni Barber welcomes Alphonso Rincón, president of Fathers Active in Communities & Education (FACE), to plan a series of father/student events as part of the FACE/Generation TX Campaign to promote college readiness. The first event will take place Sept. 26, from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. MMS is one of four middle schools in the Coastal Bend participating in the campaign.
Contributed photo Moreno Middle School Principal Joni Barber welcomes Alphonso Rincón, president of Fathers Active in Communities & Education (FACE), to plan a series of father/student events as part of the FACE/Generation TX Campaign to promote college readiness. The first event will take place Sept. 26, from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. MMS is one of four middle schools in the Coastal Bend participating in the campaign.
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Moreno Middle School administrators and teachers are inviting dads and father figures to “show up for class” Wednesday, Sept. 26, from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., for the first of three father/student events that promote students’ readiness for college.

Dads and students, however, will not always be sitting and listening; they will be on their feet laughing, talking and having fun as well.

Fathers Active in Communities and Education (FACE), an organization dedicated to the engagement of fathers in the college readiness of their children, is orienting the school’s teachers this week on the goals and logistics of the father/student events.

The activities at Moreno School are part of the FACE/Generation Texas Campaign, which includes four Coastal Bend school districts: Beeville, Taft, Robstown, and West Oso. Each district will host three father/student activities from September through November; in December, dads and students from the districts will converge in a location to be announced for a FACE/GenTX Rally.

Generation TX is a grass-roots project of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB), whose goals are:

• To develop a commitment among stakeholders to create a college-going culture in Texas public schools that prepares all students for a post-secondary education; to clarify the processes of applying for admission and student financial aid; and to increase awareness of and build support for the Texas College and Career Readiness Standards.

Fathers, or father figures, will learn about their role in the graduation of students prepared to succeed in higher education. Fathers and students will learn to access online resources such as GenTX.org.

“Junior high students need to explore careers and take the courses that will better prepare them to do college work,” said Alphonso Rincón, FACE founder and president. “Fathers know a lot about work and careers and students need fathers’ encouragement to excel in school.”

“But fathers are typically not very visible in the schools,” continued Rincón. “Our programs invite fathers to bring their ‘real world’ expertise to the schools to motivate students and to become partners with the teachers and administrators.”

On Sept. 26, fathers will start the morning with breakfast and will wrap up their half day at Moreno enjoying lunch with the students.

Dads are encouraged to pre-register for the FACE/GenTX event by Sept. 21 to provide the school with more accurate breakfast and lunch counts.

The FACE father/student events are made possible through a grant from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) to the Coastal Bend P-16 Council. FACE has been developing father/student models in Coastal Bend school districts since Rincón founded the organization in 2003. FACE’s father/student models have been gaining national recognition among college readiness practitioners and college access researchers.

For more information about the FACE events, contact Rebecca Vásquez, DAEP teacher, Moreno Middle School, at 358-6262, ext. 4034, or rvasquez@beevilleisd.net.
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