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CC7D Film Project looks back at six years in cinematic trenches
by Paul Gonzales
Oct 12, 2012 | 1384 views | 0 0 comments | 14 14 recommendations | email to a friend | print
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Joe Hilliard chats with a local filmmaker during the CC7D Retrospectacular Saturday. The event was created as a look back at some of the best short films of the past six years from the CC7D Film Project event.
Paul Gonzales photo Joe Hilliard chats with a local filmmaker during the CC7D Retrospectacular Saturday. The event was created as a look back at some of the best short films of the past six years from the CC7D Film Project event.
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Paul Gonzales photo
This giant rat head, complete with glowing red eyes, was created by Beeville filmmaker Peter Orchard in 2007 for the short film “Fuhrman” about a boy and a giant rat that lives under his bed. It also made a cameo appearance in the 2011 short “Archer & Slade and the Antlers of Gold.”
Paul Gonzales photo This giant rat head, complete with glowing red eyes, was created by Beeville filmmaker Peter Orchard in 2007 for the short film “Fuhrman” about a boy and a giant rat that lives under his bed. It also made a cameo appearance in the 2011 short “Archer & Slade and the Antlers of Gold.”
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Beeville — The Corpus Christi 7 Day Film Project has been around for a few years now and Joe Hilliard, Corpus Christi Film Society and CC7D creator and founder, decided it was time to look back.

The CC7D Film Project is a competition where anyone can form a team, show up to the House of Rock, sign up and then have exactly seven days to make a seven- to eight-minute short film.

The CC7D “Retrospectacular” was held at the Harbor Playhouse last Saturday and it was chock full of award-winning films from the years past.

“Next year is our seventh, 7 day 7 year, so we thought that we would look back at the first six years,” Hillaird explained.

“And also to let people see the films that they haven’t seen in a while or to let people see the films that didn’t go to the screenings.

“It was an idea of just looking back at everything that has happened prior to now.”

And over those six years, there’s been only two teams come out of Beeville with each only participating in a year each.

The first Beeville team competed in year two and won the “Twist” award which was a bag of tortillas as the trophy.

Trophies at the CC7D events are always inventive and usually off the wall.

But over the years there have been tons of films entered of varying quality and expertise.

So how would one go about choosing the films to be screened?

Hilliard explained, “We decided to show all the first place films and all the audience award films and all the filmmaker award films which came out to about 18 or so.

“Then let’s fill it out with one more flight of notable films and/or interesting films from all the years.

“Which was the worst part because we got in to a lot of arguments about which ones to show.”

The lot was picked by the CC7D steering committee made up of Hilliard, Heidi Hovda, Larry Cashion, Seth Caylor and Omar Becerra, who’s a filmmaker recently added to the roster to add some filmmaking perspective to the group.

“But I think we have a nice sample of what local filmmaking is as far as the 7 Day Film Project is concerned and has consisted of over the last six years.”

“It’s funny because you watch films from 2007 and the same filmmaker made a film in 2012 and to see how far they’ve come and how their skills have gotten better over the years and it’s a ‘Retrospectacular.’

“It’s a retrospective that’s spectacular.”

And it’s important for some to keep the films alive because unlike Hollywood films or feature length films, once you’ve seen them in theaters, they’re essentially gone.

You can’t run out to Redbox or Netflix and rent them.

“You don’t get to see them unless you seek them out on YouTube.

“And a lot of the films we’re showing today aren’t on YouTube, or any other kind of Internet platform, so you’re going to see a handful of these for the first time ever since we saw them.”

And after those grueling seven days of making a film, it’s important for some to see that their work is appreciated and have another chance to see them on the big screen.

“We enjoy that idea. We enjoy keeping the films alive and keeping the filmmaker’s product in front of people’s eyeballs.”

And though this is the first retrospective, it’s highly unlikely to be the last.

“I like to think that we have the creativity and certainly the broad warehouse database of films to be able to do something like that any time we want to.”

But the Corpus Christi Film Society isn’t resting on its laurels until then.

As well as doing the annual CC7D Film Project every summer, they began the Ride-In Theater, which is basically a place to watch films under the stars once a month.

“Last night we did “Night of the Living Dead” and had 600 or 700 people there.

“On Nov. 9 we’ll do viewers choice and everyone will vote that night between ‘Weird Science’ and ‘Edward Scissorhands.’ And we won’t know what won until we push play.

“We’ll have several hundred people for that.”

And those who know Hilliard and his love of film have always urged him to get in on the game he started six long years a go and go out and make a film in seven days.

Now it seems he’s worn down and given in the pressure.

“So now we’re talking about seriously doing in 2013 what we’ve always sort of flirted with doing.

“At the casting call or kick-off, we get a couple of the first place filmmakers to come up with the elements for the steering committee to make a film in seven days.

“So it’s coming,” Hilliard laughed.

And it seems that every year the Film Society has something new and exciting up its sleeve to try and get filmmaking projects going around the Coastal Bend.

It’s a tough job, but at least somebody’s doing it.

“We’re always trying to create. We’ve got all kinds of ideas, but it’s trying to balance between real life and fun life, to get them all done.”

Not to mention, the reel life.

To get more information on the CC7D and the Corpus Christi Film Society, you can visit www.corpuschristifilmsociety.com

Paul Gonzales is the entertainment writer at the Bee-Picayune and can be reached at 358-2550, ext. 116, or at thescene@mySouTex.com.
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