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SOCV meets May 31, signs charter
Jun 09, 2014 | 39 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Sons of Confederate Veterans give a rifle salute to the new SCV Beeville Camp. Members gathered on Saturday, May 31, at Norma’s Bar-B-Que and Catering to officially sign the charter.
Sons of Confederate Veterans give a rifle salute to the new SCV Beeville Camp. Members gathered on Saturday, May 31, at Norma’s Bar-B-Que and Catering to officially sign the charter.
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Pictured from left are Commander Charles Votaw, Chaplain Scott Lewis, 1st Commander Kyle Ham, Eligio Marin, adjutant, and Charles Bruce Addison, color sergeant.
Pictured from left are Commander Charles Votaw, Chaplain Scott Lewis, 1st Commander Kyle Ham, Eligio Marin, adjutant, and Charles Bruce Addison, color sergeant.
slideshow
On May 31, the Sons of Confederate Veterans Camp #2248 Colonel Santos Benavides was officially chartered at Norma’s Bar-B-Q and Catering.

The ceremony was conducted by The South Texas Brigade First Lt. Commander John F. McCammon and was attended by Sons of Confederate Veterans representatives from Angleton, Victoria, Harlingen, Corpus Christi, San Antonio and officials from the South Texas Brigade.

The new officers of Colonel Santos Benavides Camp #2248 signed the official document chart, and the proclamation was given by Commander McCammon followed by a gun salute performed by uniformed members of Corpus Christi and San Antonio.

The new camp adjutant, Eligio Marin Rodriguez, expressed for all the members their great satisfaction to honor Colonel Benavides, the forgotten Hispanic Confederate, according to Bard of the South by Rickey Pittman—author, folksinger, songwriter and storyteller, who stated: “I’m convinced that the role of Hispanic Confederates in the War Between the States has been gravely neglected. I already knew that Juan Seguin and other Tejanos during the Texas Revolution had slipped from prominence in the history books; that is why I write and talk about them so much. I think I’m also going to have to add Col. Santos Benavides (1823-1891) to my list of men to write about and include in my Texas History Program that I do in schools.

“Here are some highlights of this forgotten Hispanic Confederate leader and warrior: He was the highest ranking Hispanic to serve in the Confederacy. He was captain of the 33rd Texas until promoted to colonel in 1863. According the Handbook of Texas Online, ‘His greatest military triumph was his defense of Laredo on March 19, 1864, with 42 troops against 200 soldiers of the Union First Texas Cavalry, commanded by Col. Edmund J. Davis, who had, ironically, offered Benavides a Union generalship earlier.’

“Perhaps Benavides’ most significant contribution to the South came when he arranged for safe passage of Texas cotton along the Rio Grande to Matamoros during the Union occupation of Brownsville in 1864.”
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