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A face lift for St. Philips
by Bill Clough
Jul 20, 2014 | 707 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Stained glass window reflecting in the veneer of the Yamaha grand piano.
Stained glass window reflecting in the veneer of the Yamaha grand piano.
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The split-chancel area for a choir or for small services; stained-glass doors to the parish hall.
The split-chancel area for a choir or for small services; stained-glass doors to the parish hall.
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The split-chancel area for a choir or for small services.
The split-chancel area for a choir or for small services.
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The organ console with the rearranged organ pipes.
The organ console with the rearranged organ pipes.
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The new sign.
The new sign.
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It all started with mold on the ceiling of St. Philip’s Episcopal Church, caused by moisture seeping up from the foundation. Before it was over, it took a year to fix ­— and what a fix. New foundation piers, new cherry-wood ceiling, new air conditioning ducts, electronically controlled lighting, a split-chancel for a choir, rearranged organ pipes, expanded organ capability*, refurbished pews, extended altar space, new landscaping, a new sign, a new parking lot for both the church and the adjoining school, new outdoor stair railings, improved handicapped access, improved outside barriers to protect the stained-glass windows and stained glass doors replacing the French doors that lead to the parish hall or the sanctuary.† “Now it’s more in the Anglican tradition,” says the Rev. Clayton Elder, rector of the church. Although the work wasn’t quite finished, the congregation dedicated the face lift at a special service on Wednesday, May 21 — to coincide with the 120th anniversary of the first service conducted at St. Philip’s, in 1894.

*Thanks to an endowment by the late Cathryn Berninger.

†A gift by Speck and Polly New.
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